Tiramisu Sheet Cake


 
Tiramisu Sheet Cake - vanilla sheet cake, soaked in coffee, and finished with a creamy mascarpone frosting - www.cloudykitchen.com #sheetcake #tiramisu
Tiramisu Sheet Cake - vanilla sheet cake, soaked in coffee, and finished with a creamy mascarpone frosting - www.cloudykitchen.com #sheetcake #tiramisu
Tiramisu Sheet Cake - vanilla sheet cake, soaked in coffee, and finished with a creamy mascarpone frosting - www.cloudykitchen.com #sheetcake #tiramisu
Tiramisu Sheet Cake - vanilla sheet cake, soaked in coffee, and finished with a creamy mascarpone frosting - www.cloudykitchen.com #sheetcake #tiramisu
Tiramisu Sheet Cake - vanilla sheet cake, soaked in coffee, and finished with a creamy mascarpone frosting - www.cloudykitchen.com #sheetcake #tiramisu
Tiramisu Sheet Cake - vanilla sheet cake, soaked in coffee, and finished with a creamy mascarpone frosting - www.cloudykitchen.com #sheetcake #tiramisu
Tiramisu Sheet Cake - vanilla sheet cake, soaked in coffee, and finished with a creamy mascarpone frosting - www.cloudykitchen.com #sheetcake #tiramisu

Hiiii! We have popped up to Hudson for a long weekend, which is the best thing ever. I don't like driving in the city / America in general unless I really have to - It's on the wrong side of the road for my little brain, and I find it all a bit stressful, so it's so nice having Mum here and being able to sneak away for a little bit! 

I am just popping in quickly to share this recipe for Tiramisu Sheet Cake! Jase (Jase, hurry up and get your blog going!), whipped it up the first day we baked together, when we made these Creme egg macs. We were going to make lunch, but ended up making this sheet cake, which resulted in a delicious yet horrific sugar coma for the both of us. 

This was my first sheet cake, and it definitely won't be my last! I've been wanting to make one for a while now after seeing all the beautiful ones Adriana makes. I'm also dying to make a 'snack cake' because I think that calling a cake a 'snack cake' just because it's square is the most hilarious thing ever.

We kept this one pretty simple - started with my fave vanilla cake from the Ovenly cookbook, adapted slightly to fit in a 9"x13" dish, then just soaked it with strong coffee as soon as it came out, then once cool, loaded it up with a lush mascarpone frosting and dusted it with cooca. It was the perfect afternoon pick-me-up - so good that I had to ditch all the leftovers and leave with Jase because I certainly couldn't be trusted around them. Sheet Cakes for the Win. 

This recipe is part of a super fun coffee blog collab, organised by the lovely Nate of Terminatetor Kitchen. You can check out all the other blogger's recipes in the links at the end of this post, or follow along on IG with the hashtag #VirtualCoffeeParty2018.

A few wee tips:

  • We didn't use enough coffee the first time around! I would recommend using approx a cup, maybe even a little more if you are super into coffee. It feels like all you are doing is making the cake really yuck and soggy, but I promise it is soaking in and becoming super yum! You can see in one of the side on photos - nowhere near enough of the coffee soaked in, so it definitely needs to be increased (i've included the increased amount in the recipe)
  • If you wanted to make this boozy, you could absolutely add a little alcohol to the coffee soak.
  • The Mascarpone frosting will seem like a huge amount, but it all spreads out nicely - the cake needs more than it looks to be nicely covered!
  • We actually flipped the cake upside down out of the tin, and soaked and frosted the bottom, so that we had a perfectly smooth surface to work with. You don't have to do this, but it worked well for us!
  • I use this pan for so many things - I love it so much, because it is super sturdy and the sides are perfectly straight. 
 

 

Tiramisu Sheet Cake

- Makes one 9"x13" cake - serves approx 12 -

Cake Recipe adapted from Ovenly

Vanilla Sheet Cake
375g (3 cups) cake flour (To make this, replace 2 Tbsp of each cup of flour with corn starch)
1 1/2 Tbsp (18g) Baking powder
1 tsp salt
1 1/8 cups (270ml) heavy cream, at room temperature
3/4 (180ml) greek yoghurt
1 1/2 tbsp vanilla bean paste
375g (1 1/2 cup plus 2 Tbsp) Sugar
3 sticks (240g) butter, at room temperature
5 large eggs, at room temperature

Coffee Soak
1 1/4 cups strongly brewed coffee, cool

Mascarpone Frosting
Three 225g (8oz) containers (675g total), mascarpone
170g cream cheese, at room temperature
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
80g (1/2 cup plus 2 Tbsp) powdered sugar, sifted

Cocoa powder to dust

 

- PROCESS -

VANILLA CAKE
 

Preheat oven to 350f/180c. Grease and line a 9"x13 rectangular baking tin.

In a large bowl, sift together the cake flour, baking powder and salt. In a second bowl, combine the cream, yoghurt and vanilla paste. 

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (if you have the attachment with the blade it is great for this) or using an electric hand mixer, beat the butter and sugar on high for 5 minutes until pale, light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, scraping the bowl down well after each addition. 

Turn the mixer off, and add a third of the flour mixture. Mix until just combined, then add half of the yoghurt/cream mixture. Mix on low. Add the second third of the flour mixture, followed by the remaining liquid, and finishing with the rest of the flour. Mix on low until just incorporated. Take care not to overmix. 

Scrape the batter into the prepared tin. Bake for 40-45 minutes, or until a skewer comes out clean and the cake is golden brown.

Cool 20 minutes in the pan, then turn out upside down onto a baking rack. Poke lots of holes in the cake using a toothpick or skewer, then liberally brush the coffee over the cake, until you have used it all. Allow to cool completely.

FROSTING AND ASSEMBLY


Place the mascarpone, cream cheese, salt and vanilla bean paste in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat on high speed until well combined and creamy. Add the powdered sugar and mix well to incorporate.

Spread the frosting thickly onto the cake, using an offset spatula to create swoops in the frosting. Dust with cocoa powder. 

Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge.

 

Tiramisu Sheet Cake - vanilla sheet cake, soaked in coffee, and finished with a creamy mascarpone frosting - www.cloudykitchen.com #sheetcake #tiramisu

Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle


 
Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle
Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle
Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle
Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle
Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle
Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle
Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle
Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle
Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle
Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle
Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle

Confession time. I feel like I've been missing out for a very long time. Missing out on how insanely, amazingly, delicious choux pastry is, and how easy it is to make. For some reason it was filed squarely away in my list of 'things that are difficult to make', and i'm totally bummed out that it was there for so long. Maybe it was the french name. Maybe it's because the last time I tried to make it, I carefully piped out a whole tray of 'eclairs' before Dad pointed out I had accidentally piped out things that were definitely more phallic than originally intended. Or maybe just because I thought it was tricky. But I dunno why it was there for so long. Because not only is it fun, and easy to make, but it is ridiculously versatile. You can fill it with whatever you please, or just eat the buns as they are. Both are amazing. You need to make. 

And seeing as this is the first choux recipe I have posted, it seems only fair and reasonable that I go all out, right? Why would I share a simple cream puff recipe, filled with whipped cream, when I can take a cream puff, add a layer of crunchy delicious cookie dough before it is baked, and then fill it with caramelised bananas, pecan brittle, and caramelised white chocolate whipping ganache? If we are going to have fun with cream puffs round here, we might as well do it properly. 

My mind was low key blown by a few things here. The first was the addition of the craquelin. I had seen it before, and assumed it was a super fancy technique. I was amazed to learn that it was simply a very thin layer of cookie dough, frozen, and placed in a disc on the piped out choux mound before it is baked. As the choux bun bakes in the oven, and somehow magically puffs up, the craquelin melts and spreads over the surface of the bun, creating the most beautiful crackly finish. 

The second was the whipping ganache. When I was planning out this recipe, I turned to my amazing friend Lisa, who is a pastry chef in London. Not only is she insanely talented, but she puts up with me bombing her with questions about flavour profiles, recipes, and plating on the regular, and still hasn't told me to go away. This time in particular, she sent through a recipe for a whipping ganache, which I hadn't heard of before. It is similar to a regular ganache, except it is stabilised with a little corn syrup (or glucose), and a second measure of cream is added after the chocolate and cream have been melted together. Once it has rested in the fridge, it is whipped up. The result is amazingly light, and almost mousse-like. I'm hooked. Gonna add whipping ganache to everything now. 

When I started planning this, I knew that I wanted to find a way to incorporate my current obsession - Valrhona's Dulcey Chocolate. It is a caramelised white chocolate, which is one of the most amazing things I have ever come across. They describe it as "creamy and toasty", which is the perfect description. I am not typically a white chocolate fan, but I am full-on addicted to this stuff. I used it in the whipping ganache, and it gave it the perfect flavour - not too sweet, and not too overpowering. It was the perfect base to add to, which I did - adding a layer of caramelised banana, and a pecan brittle in the bottom of each choux bun, before topping with a big swirl of the ganache.

And OH MY. The result was insane. The crispy cream puff, the smooth silky whipping ganache, the delicate banana flavour, and the crunch from the pecan brittle, all combined to make the perfect mouthful. I will definitely be making these again. I know they look ridiculous and intimidating, but I promise that when you break down all the steps, it is 100% worth it and they aren't as scary to make as they look! I hope you give them a try! Let me know if you have any questions at all! 

A few wee tips:

  • I have included an extra 'just in case' egg in the ingredients. The reason that this is in there, is that sometimes you need to add extra egg to the pastry if necessary. You want the mixture to be at a consistency where if you dip in the beater of the mixer, the batter will form a 'v' shape and eventually break off. If it is too stiff, and breaks off very quickly, you may need to add another beaten egg, and mix again, before performing the test. 
  • This article from Erin Mcdowell explains everything so well, as per usual! 
  • I made the pecan brittle and the ganache the day before, as the brittle needs time to set, and the ganache needs overnight or 12 hours to mature.
  • Leave all the components separate until just before you serve. If you have leftover components, store them all separately, and then assemble as needed.
  • My oven really only takes one tray at a time, so I piped out both trays of choux, then only topped them with the craquelin when I was ready to bake. Store the craquelin in the freezer until you are ready to use. 
  • Choux Freezes! Freeze the cream puffs just after they have been piped out, then once solid, place in a ziploc bag in the freezer. Bake off as usual.
  • These can be filled with anything you like! The Choux au Craquelin is the perfect vehicle for any filling you like. I filled some with mascarpone whipped cream, and they were amazing! 
 

 

Choux au Craquelin with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Praline Brittle

- Makes about 12 Cream Puffs -

Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache
335g Heavy Whipping Cream
75g light corn syrup
450g Caramelised White Chocolate (I used Valrhona's Dulcey)
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
pinch salt
335g Heavy Whipping Cream, cold

Pecan Brittle
200g (1 cup) Sugar
150g (1/2 c) Corn Syrup
60g (1/4 cup) water
1/2 tsp salt
175g Pecans
2 Tbsp Unsalted butter, at room temp
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
1 tsp baking soda
Flaky Sea Salt to Finish

Craquelin
100g unsalted butter, at room temperature
120g all-purpose flour
120g dark brown sugar
1 tsp vanilla bean paste

Choux Pastry
125g whole milk
125g water
110g unsalted butter, cubed
5g Kosher Salt
5g vanilla bean paste
15g Sugar
165g All-purpose flour
240g eggs, lightly beaten, plus more if required (see tips)

Caramelised bananas
5-6 ripe but firm bananas
200g (1 cup) sugar
Butter for the pan

 

- PROCESS -

CARAMELISED WHITE CHOCOLATE WHIPPING GANACHE

In a small pan over medium heat, combine the first measure of cream, corn syrup, vanilla, and salt. Place the chocolate in a heatproof bowl. 

Bring the cream mixture to just shy of a boil, then pour over the chocolate, and immediately cover the bowl with a plate. Leave to stand for 5 minutes, then whisk the mixture until smooth. Gradually add the second measure of cream, whisking very well to incorporate. Transfer to an airtight container, and place a piece of plastic wrap over the surface of the ganache, then rest in the fridge for at least 12 hours to allow to mature. 

PECAN BRITTLE

Preheat the oven to 350˚f / 180˚c. Place the pecans on a baking sheet. Bake for approx 8 minutes, shaking often, until the pecans are lightly golden brown. Remove from the oven, allow to cool slightly, then chop roughly. Set aside.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or silpat. Measure out your butter, vanilla and baking soda, ensuring that there are no lumps in the baking soda. 

Combine the sugar, corn syrup, water, and salt in a medium pot over medium heat. Once the sugar has dissolved, add the pecans. Cook over medium heat, stirring often, until the mixture registers 300˚f / 150˚c on a sugar thermometer. 

Remove from the heat, and immediately add the butter, vanilla, and baking soda. Stir quickly to combine. Pour out onto the prepared baking sheet, spreading slightly if needed. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt and leave to cool completely. 

CRAQUELIN

Place all ingredients in a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Beat on medium until combined. Turn out the dough onto a large piece of parchment paper, and top with a second piece. Roll out to 1-2mm in thickness. Place the dough, still between the parchment sheets, in the freezer for an hour, or until ready to use (Can be made ahead). 

CHOUX AU CRAQUELIN

Preheat the oven to 400˚f / 200˚c. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Using a cooke cutter, trace six 2 1/2" circles on each baking sheet using a pen or a pencil, then flip over the baking sheet so that the side with the drawing is facing downward. 

Fit a large piping bag with a large round piping tip.

In a medium pot, combine the milk, water, butter, salt, vanilla bean paste, and sugar. Place over medium heat, and stir until the butter has melted and the mixture has begun to boil. Remove from the heat, and add the flour all at once, mixing quickly with a wooden spoon to combine. The mixture will form a thick paste. 

Return to the heat, and, stirring constantly, cook the mixture for 2 minutes to help dry it out. Transfer to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix on medium speed for 1 minute to help cool down the mixture. 

With the mixture running on low, slowly stream in the 240g egg. Mix on medium speed for 4 minutes, or until the egg is fully incorporated. Test the consistency of the batter by dipping in the beater and pulling up. If it forms a v which eventually breaks off, you are good to go. If it seems too stiff, slowly add another beaten egg and mix to incorporate. 

Transfer the choux pastry to the prepared piping bag. Using your traced circle as a guide, pipe mounds onto the baking sheet, ending each with a little flick of your wrist. If the choux has left a point, you can flatten down with a wet fingertip. Repeat with the second tray - you should end up with 12 mounds. 

Remove the craquelin from the freezer, and peel off the top piece of parchment. Using the same sized cutter you used to trace the circles on the parchment paper, cut out 12 circles of dough. Place each carefully on top of a mound of choux, pressing lightly to adhere. (if you are only baking 6 at a time, only put craquelin on the first 6 - add it to the next batch just before they go in the oven)

Bake the cream puffs for 15 min at 400˚f / 200˚c, then turn down the oven to 350˚f / 180˚c, and bake for a further 20 minutes, until the puffs are deeply golden. Remove from the oven and poke a small vent in the side of each using a paring knife or chopstick, to help the steam escape. Place on a cooling rack to cool completely. If baking in two batches, return the oven to 400˚f / 200˚c, and repeat the baking process with the remaining buns. 

CARAMELISED BANANAS

Heat a large non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. Cut the bananas into thick coins. Place the sugar on a plate or in a shallow bowl. Line a baking sheet with baking paper sprayed lightly with cooking spray, or line with a silpat. Working with about two bananas worth at a time, roll each coin in the sugar so it is coated all over.  Transfer the sugared bananas to a clean plate. 

Melt about a tablespoon of butter in the skillet, and then carefully add the bananas, spreading out evenly in the pan, and ensuring none touch. Cook for 1-2 minutes, until the slices are well caramelised, before flipping with tongs or a spatula, and cooking for a further 1-2 minutes. Remove carefully from the pan, and place on the prepared sheet. Repeat with the remaining banana. 

ASSEMBLY

Using a whisk, whip the whipping ganache until it is thick and holds its shape (the reason you do this by hand is that it is very easy to overwhip in the stand mixer, causing it to split). Transfer to a piping bag fitted with a large french star tip. 

Break up the pecan brittle into large chunks, then place in a bag, and hit with a rolling pin until it resembles a mixture of fine crumbs, and slightly larger pieces of brittle. 

Using a sharp bread knife, cut the tops off the cream puffs, about three quarters of the way up. 

Place a thin layer of crushed pecan brittle in the bottom of each cream puff. Top with a well packed layer of caramelised bananas, and then another thin layer of brittle. Pipe a swirl or mound of whipping ganache on top of the banana and brittle, and top with the choux lid you cut off earlier. 

Serve immediately. Best eaten the day that they are made.

Choux au Craquelin (Cream Puffs) with Caramelised White Chocolate Whipping Ganache, Caramelised Bananas, and Pecan Brittle

Thank you so much to Valrhona for providing me with the chocolate for this recipe! All opinions are my own.

Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper and Fennel Seed Scones


 
Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper, and Fennel Seed Scones. Perfect for a quick morning tea, a savory brunch option, or a light casual lunch.
Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper, and Fennel Seed Scones. Perfect for a quick morning tea, a savory brunch option, or a light casual lunch.
Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper, and Fennel Seed Scones. Perfect for a quick morning tea, a savory brunch option, or a light casual lunch.
Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper, and Fennel Seed Scones. Perfect for a quick morning tea, a savory brunch option, or a light casual lunch.
Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper, and Fennel Seed Scones. Perfect for a quick morning tea, a savory brunch option, or a light casual lunch.
Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper, and Fennel Seed Scones. Perfect for a quick morning tea, a savory brunch option, or a light casual lunch.
Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper, and Fennel Seed Scones. Perfect for a quick morning tea, a savory brunch option, or a light casual lunch.
Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper, and Fennel Seed Scones. Perfect for a quick morning tea, a savory brunch option, or a light casual lunch.
Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper, and Fennel Seed Scones. Perfect for a quick morning tea, a savory brunch option, or a light casual lunch.

 

One of the things that gets super confusing when you move countries is holidays. Christmas and New Year etc are always the same (mind you I got asked the other day if when it's July in America, if it's also July in NZ, so go figure), but things like Father's day etc are often at very different times. This leads to some frantic googling every now and then, just to make sure you haven't missed anything back home. I've found buying my diary from NZ helps with this too, but the internet still catches me out every now and then when I see all the Dad pics and then realise the dates are different. 

Just to make things more confusing, our Mother's day is the same as in the US. So I figured seeing as it's a worldwide celebration of sorts, I will add my contribution of food ideas to the internet. It seems as if 'Mother's day brunch' is a thing over here - for our Mum it was always just a cup of tea in bed with a piece of badly buttered toast, but brunch is always something that I can get behind. My own Mum is actually here in NYC with me right at this very second! She hasn't been here for close to four years, so I am having the best time showing her all of the things that have changed since she was last here. It's the best.

Scones for breakfast are one of my fave things! I grew up in a house where emergency scones were whipped up on the regular - our house was somewhat of a community train station with people popping in to say hi or to have a cup of tea all the time. Savoury scones are so under rated - you can add whatever you like to them, they come together fairly quickly, and are perfect to whip up in the morning for a morning tea or a light lunch. That goes for scones in general, but I do think that Savoury scones need a little more loving. 

I love the combination of Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper and Fennel seed, although it happens less than I would like around here, because I am married to a staunch cheese and bacon dude. However I figured these were too good not to share with you, and so Rich had to suck it up just this one time. The process for making these is very similar to regular scones, except you fry up all the delicious things first, leave them to cool slightly, then incorporate them in just before you add the milk. They are so delicious fresh out of the oven, but will be just as awesome the next day, warmed slightly and served with loads of good quality butter. Happy Scone-ing!

A few wee tips:

  • These are super versatile - feel free to play around with the fillings, but just be aware that you may have to adjust the amount of milk accordingly - for example if you left out the feta, you would need a little more milk to replace the moisture.
  • With that being said - you may need more or less milk depending on the water content of your feta, the size of your red pepper etc. I like to add most of the milk and give it a mix, then see if I need the rest, just to prevent them being too wet.
  • I find that freezing the butter in little cubes works best for me! Make sure that your scone contents are fairly cool before you add them to the flour and butter mixture, in order to reduce the amount of melting that happens. I either cool the mix in the pan, stirring frequently to release heat, or I spread into a shallow dish. 
  • These keep in an airtight container fairly well! They are best eaten fresh, but if you want to have them the next day too, send them for a spin in the microwave first. 
 

 

Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper, and Fennel Seed Scones

- Makes about 8 large scones -

2 tsp fennel seeds
1/2 small red onion, finely chopped
1 medium red pepper (capscicum), diced
225g (8oz) feta cheese, crumbled
300g baby spinach, roughly chopped
Salt and Pepper to season
4 cups (600g) all-purpose flour
5 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 sticks butter, cut into small cubes and frozen for 10-15 min
1/2 cup (120ml) whole milk
Cream to brush

 

- PROCESS -

Preheat the oven to 400˚f / 200˚c. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. 

In a non-stick skillet or frying pan, toast the fennel seeds over medium heat, moving constantly, until they are lightly toasted and beginning to smell fragrant. Remove and set aside. Return the skillet to the stove, and heat a little olive oil over high heat. 

Add the chopped onion, and cook for 2 minutes, stirring often. Add the red pepper, and cook for another 2 minutes, or until starting to soften. Add the spinach, and cook until wilted. Season the mixture well with salt and pepper. Remove the pan from the heat, and allow to cool for 15-20 minutes until cooled, or just warm. Add the crumbled feta and toasted fennel seeds. 

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour and baking powder. Add the butter, and rub in with your fingertips until well combined, with a few lumps remaining. Add the cooled spinach and red pepper mixture, and stir gently to incorporate. Add most of the milk, and mix with your hands or a wooden spoon to combine. Add the remainder if required (This will vary on the size of your pepper etc) - the mixture should be wet enough that it sticks together, but not so wet that it is sticky and gloopy. 

Turn the mixture out onto a floured surface, and pat into a rectangle. Gently fold the top third of the dough down to two thirds of the way down, and then fold the bottom third on top of it - as if you were folding a letter. Pat the dough out into a rectangle again, turn the dough 90 degrees, and repeat the letter fold again. Repeat one more time, before patting out into a rectangle approx 2 inches thick.

Cut the dough into 8 even pieces. Lightly dust the bottoms with flour, and space evenly on the baking sheet. Brush the tops of the scones with cream or milk. 

Bake for 25-30 minutes, until the scones have risen, and have turned a light golden brown. Allow to cool on a wire rack before serving.

 

FILLING AND ASSEMBLY

Place all of the filling ingredients in a small bowl, and mix well to combine.

Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured surface, and roll into a 24"x15" rectangle. If you find that the dough is snapping back and hard to work with, cover it lightly with a tea towel and leave it for 5 minutes to relax before continuing to roll out. 

Using an offset spatula, spread the filling evenly over the dough, ensuring the mixture goes right to the edges. Holding the short side, starting on the left, fold the dough over a third, then fold the right side over so that it covers the left, the same way that you would fold a letter to go into an envelope. Transfer the dough to a baking sheet, cover lightly with plastic wrap, and place in the fridge for 10-15 minutes to help the filling firm up a little. 

Remove the dough from the fridge and transfer back to your work surface. Roll out slightly. Using a ruler and a pastry wheel, working on the short side, cut the dough into strips approximately 2cm (0.8 inches) wide. 

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Working with one strip at a time, holding both ends, twist the strip a couple of times. Then, hold one end in your hand, and wrap the other end twice around your four fingers and thumb. Remove your thumb, and loop the strip over the top of the roll, and tuck it in underneath along with your thumb loop. (Alana's gif is v helpful here!) Place each bun on the prepared baking sheet, leaving a little space between each. Once you have twisted all of your buns, cover the baking sheet loosely with plastic, and allow to sit in a warm place for 30-40 minutes, or until the cinnamon rolls have risen slightly. While the rolls are rising, preheat the oven to 400˚f / 200˚c. 

Lightly egg wash each roll, and sprinkle liberally with pearl sugar. Bake for 15 minutes checking after 12, or until golden brown. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for 5 minutes on the baking sheet, before transferring to a wire rack and allowing to cool completely.  

Store remaining rolls in an airtight container. Warm slightly in the microwave before serving. 

Spinach, Feta, Red Pepper, and Fennel Seed Scones. Perfect for a quick morning tea, a savory brunch option, or a light casual lunch.