Salted Caramel No Churn Ice Cream


 
Salted Caramel No churn Ice Cream - a fancy wee twist on everyone's favourite no-churn recipe
Salted Caramel No churn Ice Cream - a fancy wee twist on everyone's favourite no-churn recipe
Salted Caramel No churn Ice Cream - a fancy wee twist on everyone's favourite no-churn recipe
Salted Caramel No churn Ice Cream - a fancy wee twist on everyone's favourite no-churn recipe
Salted Caramel No churn Ice Cream - a fancy wee twist on everyone's favourite no-churn recipe
Salted Caramel No churn Ice Cream - a fancy wee twist on everyone's favourite no-churn recipe
Salted Caramel No churn Ice Cream - a fancy wee twist on everyone's favourite no-churn recipe
Salted Caramel No churn Ice Cream - a fancy wee twist on everyone's favourite no-churn recipe

Our oven broke this weekend. Without any warning. I went to put in a batch of cinnamon rolls, and opened the oven to realise that there was zero heat in there. NOT ideal when you spend your life using the oven, but also not surprising that it kicked it seeing as how hard I work it. This is the second time it's broken this year, so I am secretly hoping the landlord offers to replace it, in which case I have a load of links ready to send him with my requests. Dreams are free. Luckily we have a little convection oven at the studio which Rich popped over and picked up (he went willingly, the man does love cinnamon rolls), so we were still able to have cinnamon rolls, and the oven got fixed today. All is well.

Ice cream is the perfect "my oven is broken" food. Ticks all the boxes. And as much as I love my Ice Cream maker, there is something extra awesome about no-churn Ice cream. I was totally blown away the first time that I made it - apart from being a bit more melty than regular ice cream, the texture and taste is pretty spot on when you compare it to a churned ice cream. It's a teeny bit sweeter, but just as easy (if not easier) to customise than churned ice cream, and definitely much less effort - you can have a batch whipped up in 5 minutes, and it will be ready to go as soon as it has frozen! 

I kept it pretty simple this time around and added in a salted caramel drizzle between the layers of the ice cream. The Caramel is a super simple recipe - sugar is cooked until it is a lovely toasty amber colour, which you then deglaze with butter, before stirring in some cream, and a healthy dose of salt. I also added a little special ingredient at the end - some bakers grind by Pepper and Me. Pepper and Me is a New Zealand company run by my friend the lovely Cherie - she originally started her company to produce products which help with milk production in breastfeeding Mums, but is slowly taking over the spice scene in NZ with epic seasonings, sauces, pastes and flavoured salts. If you are in NZ make sure that you get your hands on some of this baker's grind - It's a Vanilla baked Salt and Sugar blend, mixed with some cinnamon, star anise and cardamom. The result is a grinder full of happiness that goes well in baked goods, or in this case, caramel. If you aren't New Zealand based, the caramel tastes just as delicious without the spices - I have added an adaptation in the recipe!

A few wee notes:

  • The recipe I have included for the caramel makes much more than you need, but in my opinion, if you are going to go to the effort to make caramel, you might as well make a good sized batch - it keeps for a really long time, and is so good on everything!
  • You don't need a stand mixer for this recipe - electric beaters work just as well, or a whisk if you are feeling energetic! 
  • Have everything ready to go when you make the caramel, as things can move quite quickly! 
  • Watch the sugar for the caramel very very carefully as it can turn very quickly
  • The Salted Caramel needs time to cool fully before you use it, so make sure you account for this. 
  • Remaining salted caramel can be stored in the fridge - just allow it to stand at room temperature to soften slightly before using, otherwise you can microwave it in 15 second bursts to soften.
 

 

Salted Caramel No Churn Ice Cream
- Makes about 6 cups (one loaf pan) -

Salted Caramel
2 cups (400g) sugar
12 Tbsp (170g) unsalted butter, cut in chunks, at room temperature
1 cup (250ml) heavy cream, warmed
2 Tbsp ground Baker's Grind (Spiced sugar and salt blend)
1 tsp flaky sea salt (if you are not using baker's grind, increase this to 1 Tbsp)

No Churn Ice Cream
1 400g (14oz) can sweetened condensed milk
2 cups (500ml) heavy cream
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
6 Tbsp Salted Caramel

- PROCESS -

SALTED CARAMEL

Place the sugar in a medium sized heavy bottom saucepan. Heat on medium, stirring constantly. The sugar will start to form clumps, then begin to melt. Cook until is it amber in colour, then remove from the heat and immediately add all of the butter. Be careful as the caramel will bubble rapidly. Once the butter is incorporated, add the cream and stir well. Stir in the baker's grind and / or salt, and pour into a glass jar. Allow to cool completely.

ICE CREAM

Place the condensed milk, cream, and vanilla in a large bowl, or in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Mix on medium - high until the mixture is thick and peaks form.

Place a third of the ice cream mixture into a freezer safe container (I used a loaf pan). Drizzle over about 2 Tbsp of the salted Caramel. Top with the second third of ice cream, drizzle with caramel, then repeat the process once more. Cover the container loosely with plastic wrap and freeze until solid, at least 6-7 hours, preferably overnight. 

Return leftovers to the freezer soon after serving.

 

Salted Caramel No churn Ice Cream - a fancy wee twist on everyone's favourite no-churn recipe

Thank you to the lovely Cherie of Pepper and Me for sending goodies all the way to NYC! 

Blueberry Rhubarb Slab Pie


 
Blueberry and Rhubarb Slab pie - the ideal summer dessert for feeding a crowd!
Blueberry and Rhubarb Slab pie - the ideal summer dessert for feeding a crowd!
Blueberry and Rhubarb Slab pie - the ideal summer dessert for feeding a crowd!
Blueberry and Rhubarb Slab pie - the ideal summer dessert for feeding a crowd!
Blueberry and Rhubarb Slab pie - the ideal summer dessert for feeding a crowd!
Blueberry and Rhubarb Slab pie - the ideal summer dessert for feeding a crowd!
Blueberry and Rhubarb Slab pie - the ideal summer dessert for feeding a crowd!
Blueberry and Rhubarb Slab pie - the ideal summer dessert for feeding a crowd!
Blueberry and Rhubarb Slab pie - the ideal summer dessert for feeding a crowd!
Blueberry and Rhubarb Slab pie - the ideal summer dessert for feeding a crowd!

Hiiiii from Montauk! Rich and I snuck away for a a little bit to crash Jill's family holiday! It's only a 3 hour train ride from NYC, but feels like a totally different world up here - everything goes at a much more relaxed pace, which is insanely refreshing. The first day we arrived Jill and I did a wee tour of the farm stands up here - we picked herbs at one, and fresh shishito peppers straight off the plant at another. There are some insanely amazing farms up here with incredible missions (Bhumi donates 80% of their food to a NYC food bank and Amber Waves is female run!), so it was so nice to finally see the places I have heard so much about! A few of these places have a pick-your-own CSA section too, which I can only imagine would be a dream to be a part of! We have slowly been making our way through the giant pile of produce that we came back with, supplemented by insanely fresh fish from the docks, the cooking sessions interspersed with lying on beaches and watching the eclipse (!!) 

It was my Birthday on Monday and I couldn't think of a better way to spend it than at the beach. I've raved about Jill and her family many times before, but I honestly don't have enough words to explain how grateful I am that we have found an little family extension in this crazy city, and that I was able to spend my birthday with them! As the biggest home body, having something that feels like home and people that feel like family in a big city so far from home just means the world to me.  It's hard to get back to NZ as much as I would like (it's super far away), so being able to join in on some family action every now and then is just the best ever. I had an amazing day Monday - we went to the beach and watched the eclipse, then had an amazing dinner right on the water.

Carrying on from last year's yesterbirthday pie, I figured it was only fair that we make it happen again and it become a birthday tradition! On our expeditions around the farm stands we picked up some blueberries, and I was super excited to find some rhubarb, so a blueberry rhubarb pie was definitely on the cards. I have been meaning to make a slab pie for a long time now - they are pretty quick and easy to throw together, and are perfect for feeding a crowd. We got a little fancy and added a braided edge and some stamped cut-outs, but it would be just as amazing with a simple lattice on the top. We fluffed around in the kitchen making and shooting this yesterday, then ate slices of it, still warm, loaded with vanilla ice-cream. The best. The filling was jammy and not too sweet, and set up perfectly. Deffo making more slab pies. You should too. 

A few wee notes:

  • Apologies for being that guy who posts a rhubarb recipe so late in the summer, but it still seems to be available! If you can't get your hands on any, sub in some extra blueberries. You may have to dial back the sugar content a little. 
  • We managed to make this with a 1.5x recipe of my usual double pie crust. It made a base, a braided edge and lots of pastry stamps. However there was a lot of re-rolling scraps, so if you would like to do a lattice top, or not have to worry about scraps, I recommend using the quantities listed here (which is a double of my regular recipe). I like to make it in two batches just to help keep things cold!
  • We made this in a Jelly Roll Pan (10" x 15"), but if you don't have one, a quarter sheet pan (9" x 13") will work too - just adjust the amount of filling slightly! We made the stamped cut-outs with these and these! Pie stamps are one of my fave things - quickest way to add a little fancy to a pie! I find that freezing the rolled out dough for 10-15 mins before you stamp it helps get a nice clean cut.
  • Pie dough is best if made the night before!
  • Top this bad boy however you want - with pie stamps, braids, a lattice, the choice is yours! 
 

 

Blueberry Rhubarb Slab Pie
- Makes one 10" x 15" pie (approx 12 servings) -

Pie crust recipe from four and twenty blackbirds

Pie dough
5 cups (620g) All-purpose flour
Pinch of Salt
4 tsp (16g) sugar
4 sticks (450g) cold butter, cut into cubes
1 cup (240ml) cold water
1 cup ice
1/4 cup (60ml) Apple cider vinegar

Filling
1kg (2.2lbs) Fresh blueberries, washed and sorted
500g (1.1lbs) Fresh Rhubarb, finely diced
1 1/2 cups (300g) raw sugar, plus more to sprinkle
1/4 c plus 2 Tbsp (50g) corn startch
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp vanilla bean paste

Egg wash - 1 egg whisked with 1 Tbsp water

- PROCESS -

PIE DOUGH

Make the Pie dough in two batches. Combine the ice, water, and cider vinegar in a bowl and stir lightly to combine. Place 2 1/2 cups flour, a pinch of salt, and 2 tsp sugar in a large bowl and stir lightly to combine. Cut 2 sticks (226g) butter into chunks, and add to the flour. Toss lightly to coat. Working quickly, using a pastry blender or  your fingers,  cut the butter into the flour mixture until there are only pea-sized chunks left. You want a few lumps of butter remaining to keep the pastry nice and tender.

Sprinkle a few tablespoons of the ice water into the flour and butter mixture, and using a stiff spatula or your hands, mix in well. Continue adding water a tablespoon at a time ( I normally need about 8-10 tbsp) until you have a dough that holds together well, but is not too wet. Squeeze together with your fingertips to make a homogenous dough. Shape into a rectangle and wrap tightly in plastic wrap. 

Repeat the process again. Place both rectangles of dough in the fridge to rest for at least two hours, or preferably overnight.

FILLING AND ASSEMBLY

Roll out one rectangle of dough on a lightly floured surface, until it is approximately 1/8" (3mm) thick. Carefully line a 10" x 15" pan with the dough. Trim excess, leaving approximately 1 inch overhang. Rest in the freezer while you Prepare the filling. 

Place the Blueberries, rhubarb, sugar, corn starch, salt, and vanilla in a large bowl and toss to combine. Transfer to the prepared lined pan. Return to the freezer while you roll out the second rectangle of dough. Cut out your desired topping design - we did four three-strand braids to go around the edges of the pie, then used the rest of the dough to make stamped out shapes. Secure the braids, if using, to the edges of the pan using a little egg wash. Add the stamped out dough to the top of the pie in your desired pattern. Alternatively, top the pie with a lattice decoration of your choice. Trim any overhanging pie dough. Place the pie in the freezer to rest while you preheat the oven.

BAKING

Preheat the oven to 425˚f / 220˚c. Brush the top of the pie with egg wash, and sprinkle with additional raw sugar. Bake for 20 minutes, or until the pastry is set and beginning to go golden. Reduce the oven temperature to 375˚f / 190˚c, and bake for a further 40 to 45 minutes, or until the pastry is golden brown and the filling is bubbling. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack before cutting. Serve warm or at room temperature with ice cream or whipped cream.

Blueberry and Rhubarb Slab pie - the ideal summer dessert for feeding a crowd!

One Bowl Devil's Food Layer Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting


 
One Bowl Devil's food Layer Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting - from the new Bravetart book!
One Bowl Devil's food Layer Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting - from the new Bravetart book!
One Bowl Devil's food Layer Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting - from the new Bravetart book!
One Bowl Devil's food Layer Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting - from the new Bravetart book!
One Bowl Devil's food Layer Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting - from the new Bravetart book!
One Bowl Devil's food Layer Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting - from the new Bravetart book!
One Bowl Devil's food Layer Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting - from the new Bravetart book!
One Bowl Devil's food Layer Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting - from the new Bravetart book!

I've been on some sort of Cake Hiatus. And I'm not sure why. It could be because the leftovers are a little harder to get rid of - mind you our doormen don't mind if there's a slice cut out. I think part of it was that sometimes people thought it was all just cake over here. I have been introduced a few times as 'This is Erin, and she makes amazing cakes!' Which is all well and good and I hugely appreciate that people think the cake is amazing, but I like to think that i'm a little more versatile than just being a cake person. Or even just a sweets person - I have a fairly strong pasta game too ;). So I guess I've just been making other things to prove a point that I can do it, even just to myself? What a weirdo. Or maybe it's because I fell down a giant pie rabbit hole - there's something so calming about making pie. And Bread. Sorry Cake.

The excitement of making cake slowly crept back up on me - I forgot how fun it was. And then when Stella's new book: Bravetart: Iconic American Desserts showed up in my mailbox, I knew it was time. I've been waiting for this book for what feels like the longest time ever, and it is even more amazing than I knew it was going to be. Stella is an absolute wizard, and a lady after my own heart - she treats baking as a science (because it is), heavily endorses the use of a scale (if you don't have any, buy some RIGHT NOW because it will change your baking forever), and includes things like cooked temperature for cakes, and little hacks you never knew you needed. I have followed her work since way way back when she had a blog, and her magic ways have made their way into the way I bake. Her recipes are solid, easy to follow, and reliable, and can easily be adapted to suit your liking - I just can't say enough good things about them.

Deciding what to make from the book first proved to be kind of difficult. Because I didn't grow up here, there's so many nostalgic childhood desserts in this book that I have never tried. Which I kind of like - it means that the first time I try them, they will likely be home made. However I kept turning back to the one bowl devil's food layer cake. It looked rich and fudgy, and had a milk chocolate frosting. I can never go past a double chocolate situation. 

This cake is a dream - I almost went full on Bruce Bogtrotter on it. It all comes together in one pot, which is amazing. The layers bake lovely and flat, which makes assembly super easy. The frosting is a simple whipped ganache, which you make in the bowl of the stand mixer, leave to cool, then whip up all in the same bowl. (Best Idea ever?!? I think so). You need it in your life. Congrats Stella! This book is so, so beautiful, and I can't wait to slowly work my way through it! xx

A few wee notes:

  • This recipe is made in three pans. While owning three pans the same size probably seems excessive to most people, trust me on this one when I say that they are insanely handy to have. Trying to cut a cake in half cleanly and evenly sucks. Baking the layers in individual pans sucks much less. You can also use the pans for all sorts of other things - cinnamon rolls, cheesecake, quiche, ice cream, etc. I have three of these and I love them to bits. They are super easy to wash, and things don't stick to them.
  • Be careful when covering the ganache to cool - I was silly and didn't let it cool enough before putting it in to the fridge and a teeny bit of condensation dripped into it which made it the tiniest bit grainy, but still tasted amazing.
  • The Ganache needs up to 6 hours to cool before you can whip it, or you can cool it in an ice bath.
  • Buy this book because you need it.

I am doing a giveaway over on Instagram where you can win a copy of this book! Head on over to enter! Feel free to stop by Saveur and pop a vote in on your way past too! x

 

 

One Bowl Devil's Food Layer Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting
- Makes one 8 by 4 inch, three-layer cake -

Reprinted with Permission from Bravetart: Iconic American Desserts

Devil's Food Cake
3 sticks (12oz) unsalted butter
1 1/2 cups (12 oz) Black coffee or black tea
1 cup (3 oz) Dutch-process cocoa powder
1 1/4 cups (6 oz) finely chopped dark chocolate, approx 72% cocoa solids
2 cups gently packed (16oz) Light brown sugar
1 Tbsp vanilla extract
1 tsp kosher salt
6 large eggs, cold
3 Tbsp (1 1/2 oz) egg yolks (about 3 large eggs worth)
2 cups (9 oz) all-purpose flour
1 Tbsp baking soda

Milk Chocolate Frosting
3 cups (24 oz) heavy cream
3 3/4 cups (20 oz) good quality milk chocolate, finely chopped
1/4 tsp kosher salt
 

- PROCESS -

CAKE

Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and preheat the oven to 350˚f / 180˚c. Line three 8 inch cake pans with parchment paper, and spray with baking spray. (If you don't have three pans, the batter can be kept at room temp for 90 mins)

Combine butter and coffee in a 5 quart pot, and set over low heat. Once the butter is melted , remove from the heat and whisk in the cocoa and chocolate, followed by the brown sugar, vanilla, and salt. Mix in the eggs and yolks. Sift in the flour and baking soda. Whisk thoroughly to combine, then divide the mixture between the 3 pans (it should yield approx 23 ounces in each)

Bake until the cakes are firm, about 30 minutes, or until they register 210˚f on a thermometer. A toothpick inserted in the centre will emerge with a few crumbs left on it. Cool until no trace of warmth remains, at least 90 minutes. 

MILK CHOCOLATE FROSTING

In a 3 quart stainless steel pot, warm the cream over medium heat. When bubbling hard around the edges, pour over chocolate in the bowl of a stand mixer. Whisk by hand until smooth, stir in the salt, and set aside until no longer steaming. Cover and refrigerate six hours, or until thick and cold (45˚f) about 6 hours. Alternatively you can cool in an ice bath, stirring frequently, for about an hour.

Whip with a whisk attachment on medium high until the frosting is thick and silky. (75 to 120 seconds). Use immediately.

ASSEMBLY

Invert each pan onto a wire rack, and peel off the parchment. Trim the tops of the cake using a serrated knife. Place one layer cut side up on a serving plate or turntable. Cover with a cup of the frosting spreading evenly with the back of a spoon or offset spatula. Repeat with the second and third layers, cut side down. Finish the top and sides of the cake with the remaining frosting, and the decorations of your choice (I piped a little leftover on as blobs around the top of the cake, and then added some chocolate balls). 

The frosted cake will keep under a dome or pot for 24 hours. Once cut, wrap slices individually and store at room temp for up to 4 days.

One Bowl Devil's food Layer Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting - from the new Bravetart book!