Sage salted caramel ice-cream pops


 
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
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Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel

I got a couple of exciting things in the mail the last few weeks. I finally took the plunge and got an ice cream attachment for my kitchenaid, and, because it's finally starting to feel warm here, which means it's nearly ice-block season, I got a popsicle mould that doesn't suck like my last one did! 

The most exciting thing that came in the mail though, which prompted the purchase of the other items, was the lovely Lily's new book! I have yet to meet Lily in person, although we have met over facetime a month or so ago when I offered up Richard's adobe expertise (poor guy, it happens often), and I can't wait to finally meet IRL one day! Lily has a beautiful wee corner of the internet where she shares amazing recipes, and her book is the most perfect extension of that. I've already made the roasted strawberry and basil cream pie, and I am eyeing up loads more recipes to make in the coming months. 

Lily's book is everything I imagined it to be, and so much more (Plus it arrived packaged with a bag of lavender oat bath soak, meaning that it also smells amazing). It is divided into chapters by herbs, and each recipe is accompanied by an amazing story. Although the first thing I made from the book was from the basil chapter, I had been eyeing up the sage section since long before this book was released. And it did NOT disappoint. I took my ice cream maker and popsicle moulds on their maiden voyage, and made the sage salted caramel ice-cream from the book. The recipe in the book is just for regular ice-cream, but I couldn't resist popping some into my new moulds, just to make sure they worked! 

This is quite possibly one of the best ice-creams I have ever tasted. It starts with a sage salted caramel (which is amazing in itself, and i'm totally making again to put on everything), which is then added to a sage infused custard. The whole lot then takes a twirl in the ice cream maker, and the result is nothing short of incredible. It is rich, but also delicately flavoured. The sage cuts through the creaminess perfectly, and the whole thing is rounded off by a drizzle of extra caramel. I made it both in a freezer-safe container as scoop-able ice cream, and also in the moulds to make ice-cream pops. Both worked perfectly!

 

 

Sage Salted Caramel ice-cream pops
- Makes 6 pops, or 1 quart of ice-cream -

Printed with permission from Kale and Caramel

Sage Salted Caramel
1 1/2 cups (300g) granulated sugar or coconut sugar (I used 1 cup granulated and 1/2 cup coconut)
1/4 cup (60ml) water
1/2 cup (120ml) heavy cream, at room temperature
1/2 tsp salt
approx. 20 fresh sage leaves

Ice cream base
3/4 cup sage salted caramel
2 egg yolks
2 cups (480ml) heavy cream
1 1/2 cups (360ml) whole milk
1/2 tsp vanilla bean paste
1/4 tsp salt
approx. 60 fresh sage leaves
 

- PROCESS -

Freeze the bowl of your ice-cream maker overnight. 

SAGE SALTED CARAMEL

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, stir the coconut sugar and water until the sugar dissolves. Raise the heat to medium-high and bring to a boil, swirling occasionally. Cook for 2-3 minutes total, until amber in colour, or until the mixture measures 225˚f / 107˚c on a candy thermometer (Note - if you are using granulated sugar, this process will take longer than if you are using coconut sugar). Remove from the heat and add the heavy cream and salt, whisking until combined. Add the sage leaves, and steep for 25 minutes. Strain to remove the sage leaves. Let the caramel cool for at least 20 minutes.

ICE CREAM

Whisk the egg yolks in a medium bowl. In a large saucepan, whisk together 3/4 cup of the sage salted caramel (reserve the rest for drizzling) with the heavy cream, milk, vanilla, egg yolks and salt. Whisk until steam rises. Add the sage leaves. 

Cook over a low heat until it measures 170˚f / 77˚c on a thermometer, or until it thickens slightly and coats the back of the spoon. Taste to see if you've reached the desired level of sage-iness, and if so, strain out the sage leaves. If not, leave the sage leaves in to steep while the custard cools (I left them in and it turned out perfectly). Transfer to a covered container, and refrigerate until cooled completely. 

Once chilled, if the sage is still in the custard, strain it out and discard. Freeze in an ice cream maker, according to the manufacturer's instructions, until the consistency is smooth and thick.

Transfer to a freezer-safe, airtight container or popsicle moulds, and allow to freeze for at least 6 hours before serving. 

To serve, top with the reserved sage salted caramel.

Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel

Recipe is Copyright © 2017 by Lily Diamond from KALE & CARAMEL: Recipes for Body, Heart, and Table published by Atria Books, a division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.