Chicken, Leek and Sun dried Tomato Pesto Pie with Homemade Rough Puff Pastry


 
Chicken, Leek and Sun dried Tomato Pesto Pie with Homemade Rough Puff Pastry - creamy chicken and leek filling is tucked into a flaky tender homemade rough puff pastry. Perfect to feed a crowd.
Chicken, Leek and Sun dried Tomato Pesto Pie with Homemade Rough Puff Pastry - creamy chicken and leek filling is tucked into a flaky tender homemade rough puff pastry. Perfect to feed a crowd.
Chicken, Leek and Sun dried Tomato Pesto Pie with Homemade Rough Puff Pastry - creamy chicken and leek filling is tucked into a flaky tender homemade rough puff pastry. Perfect to feed a crowd.
Chicken, Leek and Sun dried Tomato Pesto Pie with Homemade Rough Puff Pastry - creamy chicken and leek filling is tucked into a flaky tender homemade rough puff pastry. Perfect to feed a crowd.
Chicken, Leek and Sun dried Tomato Pesto Pie with Homemade Rough Puff Pastry - creamy chicken and leek filling is tucked into a flaky tender homemade rough puff pastry. Perfect to feed a crowd.
Chicken, Leek and Sun dried Tomato Pesto Pie with Homemade Rough Puff Pastry - creamy chicken and leek filling is tucked into a flaky tender homemade rough puff pastry. Perfect to feed a crowd.

It got a tiny bit cold for a wee minute here in NYC and so I immediately had to make a chicken pie. There's something about it - for Rich it is a total taste of home, and I just love the cozy way it makes the house smell (even if I did have to turn the air con on toward the end because it was heating up the house too much). 

I mixed things up a bit this time and went for a chicken, leek and sun dried tomato pesto pie. Leeks are so underrated - they give a very subtle onion flavour, and cook down to be lovely and soft, giving substance to the filling without being overwhelming. I also added the usual suspects - bacon, celery and carrot, then thickened the filling with a little flour, chicken stock and cream. The last step which really helped elevate this to the next level was a big dollop of Filippo Berio Sun dried Tomato Pesto, which added another flavour profile into the mix to give this a tiny twist on the standard chicken pie.

A regular pie dough is usually my go to for a savoury pie, but I have been wanting to try making rough puff (I always want it to be called Ruff Puff!) for a long time now, so figured this would be a great time to do it! There are loads and loads of recipes for it on the internet, all with their own methods and ingredient ratios, so I figured I might as well go ahead and add my own! Traditional puff pastry is super fun to make but it is a little time consuming and can be tricky in the summer due to the butter melting quickly. Rough puff is a great alternative - it is much more forgiving, and a little less time consuming to make. It does still involve a little time in terms of resting and chilling the dough, but the actual active time is very small. I think this is going to be my new go to for a savoury pie - it is flaky and tender, and bakes up to be amazingly golden brown. It is 100% worth the effort, promise. 

This is the third recipe I am bringing to you in partnership with Filippo Berio! Seeing as autumn is maybe finally around the corner, I wanted to share a recipe for something a little cozy and comforting. Next weekend I am going up to Bridgehampton to check out the Filippo Berio booth at the Hampton Classic - I will be posting on IG stories so you can follow along!  

A few wee tips:

  • I kind of combined the recipe of a rough puff but incorporated some of the folds that a traditional puff pastry has. It's way way less stressful to make, because you don't have to worry about your butter block being too warm or cold and breaking up and coming to the surface. 
  • I used a food processor to grate my frozen butter which worked great (grate? I'll stop now) but if you grate by hand, put your grater in the freezer for a wee bit before you start so it is nice and cold. If you can though, I would absolutely recommend using the whizz!
  • The pastry will look super shaggy at the beginning but I promise that it will be lovely and smooth by the time you are finished with your turns. I do a total of 6 turns - if your dough is cool enough and you work quickly you can usually get away with doing two at a time, but if you are working in the summer, you may have to pop it back in the fridge just for a little bit. Don't be intimidated - because there's no butter to break up because it's all incorporated, a quick rest in the fridge fixes everything!
  • If you want to make this with store bought puff pastry, you will need about 1kg. Home made pie dough will also work amazingly! This quantity will work - leave out the sugar. I did do a fairly tight lattice, which means that you need double the area of the top of the pie to make enough strips (full size of the top for the horizontal, and full for the vertical) which means the top is quite crust heavy, but I love a good pastry to filling ratio, so you can do a wider lattice if you would like less pastry. 
  • I put a bottom crust on this but if you like you could just do a top crust and do it as a big pot pie - add a little strip of pastry around the edge of the tin and fold down over the filling a little so that the top crust has something to join onto.
  • The Rough puff gets a bit hard to work with if it gets too warm from the filling, so ideally give your filling a little time to cool before you assemble. 
  • This is great to make ahead - you can prep the filling and then assemble the pie, then just pop it in the fridge until you are ready. It will likely need an extra 10-15 minutes in the oven to compensate for this, but just keep an eye on it. You want the filling to be bubbling when you take it out. Don't egg wash it until just before you bake.
  • I used Filippo Berio's Sun dried Tomato pesto in this recipe, which really elevated the flavours, but if you aren't able to get sundried tomato, a tablespoon of dried or a small handful of fresh thyme is a great alternative. 
 

 

Chicken, Leek and Sun dried Tomato Pesto Pie with Homemade Rough Puff Pastry 

- Makes one large pie - serves 6-10 depending on serving size -

Pastry recipe slightly adapted from Epicurious

Rough Puff Pastry
450g Unsalted Butter, frozen (if your butter does not come in sticks, chop into a few pieces before freezing)
450g all-purpose flour
3/4 tsp salt
1 cup ice water

Filling
200g (0.4lb) bacon, finely chopped
800g (1.8lb) boneless, skinless chicken breast, chopped into small pieces
2 Tbsp Unsalted Butter
2 large leeks (approximately 500g chopped), Chopped into fine half moons
2 large carrots, finely chopped
3 ribs celery, finely chopped
75g (1/2 cup) all-purpose flour
2 cups (500ml) chicken stock
3/4 cup (190ml) heavy cream
150g Filippo Berio Sun dried Tomato Pesto


Egg wash - 1 egg whisked with 1 Tbsp water
 

- PROCESS -

ROUGH PUFF PASTRY

Sift together the flour and salt in a large bowl. Grate the butter either in a food processor or by hand, and toss with the flour. Add half a cup of the ice water, and mix by hand to combine. Add extra water, a few tablespoons at a time, until you have a cohesive dough that holds together when gently squeezed. Be careful not to add too much water. 

Turn out the dough onto a piece of plastic wrap, and shape into a rough rectangle. It will be shaggy and not smooth. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap and place on a sheet pan. Chill in the fridge for an hour. 

Remove the dough and place on a lightly floured surface. Roll into a rectangle approximately 13" x 20" (30cm x 50cm). Brush any excess flour off the surface. Starting with a short side, fold the dough into thirds like a letter - bring one third up, and then fold the second third over it. Roll the dough out again and repeat the folding process. Wrap in the plastic wrap, place on the sheet pan and chill for 30-40 minutes. 

Repeat the rolling and chilling process two more times - each time you remove the dough from the fridge, perform two rounds of rolling out and folding. In total you will give the dough 6 folds, in 3 sessions. 

Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and leave to chill for a few hours before using, or ideally overnight. 

FILLING

Place a large frying pan, cast iron skillet or dutch oven over medium high heat. Add the bacon to the cold pan, and cook until just golden brown. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside, reserving fat for cooking the chicken. 

Working in two batches, cook the chicken until golden brown and cooked through. Remove and set aside. 

Add the butter to the pan, and allow to melt, then add the leeks, carrots, and celery. Cover the pan and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10-15 minutes, until the leeks are soft and the carrots are tender. Season well with salt and pepper. 

If you are working with a small frying pan, transfer the leek mixture into a large pot and place over medium heat. Add the flour, and stir well to combine. Add the chicken stock and cream, and mix well. Cook until the mixture thickens slightly, then add the bacon and chicken and stir to incorporate. Add the sun dried tomato pesto, and mix well. Set the mixture aside to cool slightly. If you would like to speed up the cooling process you can transfer to a shallow baking dish. 

ASSEMBLY

Preheat the oven to 375˚f / 190˚c. Have your baking tin ready - I used a 13" x 10" enamel baking dish, but a 9" x 13" baking tin would work great too. Remove the puff pastry from the fridge and divide into two, with one piece larger than the other (about a 1/3 to 2/3 split). Wrap up the larger piece and return to the fridge. 

Roll out the smaller piece of pastry on a lightly floured surface, to a few inches larger than your baking tin, and line the bottom and the sides with the pastry, allowing a little overhang. Freeze briefly for 5-10 minutes to help firm up. 

Add the cooled chicken filling to the pastry lined tin, smoothing down with a spoon. 

Roll out the second piece of pastry on a lightly floured surface (it may help to divide it in two and roll out each piece individually), and using a pizza roller or pastry wheel, cut lattice strips. I find that the easiest way to make sure I have enough is to divide the pastry into two, and roll out each to about the same size as the surface of the pie, before cutting into strips. That way you should have enough horizontal and vertical strips. Lattice your pie as desired - I did a simple lattice, but treated two strips as one to give a double strip lattice effect. If you have extra pastry you can make some braids to go around the edge, or you can just trim the pastry flush with the edge of the pan and then fold it inward, crimping lightly. 

Brush the pastry with the egg wash. Bake for 45-55 minutes, until the pastry is a deep golden brown and the filling is bubbling. Allow to stand for 10 minutes before serving. 

Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge. 

Chicken, Leek and Sun dried Tomato Pesto Pie with Homemade Rough Puff Pastry - creamy chicken and leek filling is tucked into a flaky tender homemade rough puff pastry. Perfect to feed a crowd.

Thank you so much to Filippo Berio for Sponsoring this post! All opinions are my own. 

Peach and Thyme Hand Pies


 
Peach and Thyme Hand pies - sweet, ripe peaches are enveloped in a tender flaky pie crust, and enhanced with the delicate flavour of thyme. #handpies #peachpies #pie #baking #peach #thyme
Peach and Thyme Hand pies - sweet, ripe peaches are enveloped in a tender flaky pie crust, and enhanced with the delicate flavour of thyme. #handpies #peachpies #pie #baking #peach #thyme
Peach and Thyme Hand pies - sweet, ripe peaches are enveloped in a tender flaky pie crust, and enhanced with the delicate flavour of thyme. #handpies #peachpies #pie #baking #peach #thyme
Peach and Thyme Hand pies - sweet, ripe peaches are enveloped in a tender flaky pie crust, and enhanced with the delicate flavour of thyme. #handpies #peachpies #pie #baking #peach #thyme
Peach and Thyme Hand pies - sweet, ripe peaches are enveloped in a tender flaky pie crust, and enhanced with the delicate flavour of thyme. #handpies #peachpies #pie #baking #peach #thyme
Peach and Thyme Hand pies - sweet, ripe peaches are enveloped in a tender flaky pie crust, and enhanced with the delicate flavour of thyme. #handpies #peachpies #pie #baking #peach #thyme
Peach and Thyme Hand pies - sweet, ripe peaches are enveloped in a tender flaky pie crust, and enhanced with the delicate flavour of thyme. #handpies #peachpies #pie #baking #peach #thyme

Ok so I just checked, and I have 21 pie recipes on this blog. TWENTY ONE. There's like, 150 something recipes total, 21 of which are pies. Whoopsies. And it's probably only going to get worse sorry - I promise not to double up on you, but there's just something that really gets me going about spending an afternoon pottering round in the kitchen rolling out dough, or working out a lattice, or cutting out shapes. Pie is the best way (in my opinion) to quickly turn an in season fruit into a beautiful dessert, while still maintaining the integrity of the fruit itself - adding starch and sugar, and wrapping it up in a flaky pie crust is only going to make something more delicious. You're not tucking it into a cake or hiding it in a muffin - pie really lets you hero what you are working with. Plus I will never get sick of pretty intricate lattices. So as long as you guys are ok with it, there's going to be more pie. Actually, even if you're not ok with it, it's going to be here anyway. 

I can't help myself when peaches are in season, and so when I found myself, yet again, with a good few kilos of super ripe peaches, some pie dough in the freezer, and a brand spanking new thyme plant / balcony garden, I really didn't have a choice but to make pie. I love a regular sized pie, but I love pie dough more, so hand pies are one of my favourite ways to really exploit the filling to crust ratio. The addition of thyme was a great move on my part - the thyme is super delicate, and gives the filling a little something extra. 

I kept these ones super simple - no pastry stamps in sight, just two circles of dough, filled, and pressed together. Crazy easy, and can be done well ahead of time - they actually freeze super well so if you wanted to make a bunch, you could freeze them then bake on demand. 

A few wee tips:

  • I peeled my peaches by boiling a large pot of water, and preparing an ice bath. I then scored a cross in the bottom of each peach, placed them in the boiling water for 30 seconds, then transferred immediately to the ice bath. The skins should slide right off. If you want to keep the skins on, that works too!
  • If you can, make your pie dough overnight. I actually took this dough from the freezer and thawed it overnight before using.
  • I like to layer up the circles as I cut them out on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper - to make a second layer, make sure you place another piece of baking paper between the circles. 
  • Work with one hand pie at a time - so fill it and seal it up, and then move onto the next one rather than making a production line. That way you reduce your chances of the juice going everywhere. 
  • If your peaches are super ripe or crazy juicy you may need to add a little more starch - add an extra tablespoon or so and see how you go if it is looking kinda soupy. 
 

 

Peach and Thyme Hand Pies

- Makes 12 hand pies -

Pie Dough
2 1/2 cups (310g) Flour
Pinch of Salt
2 tsp (8g) sugar
2 sticks (226g) cold butter, cut into cubes
1 cup (240ml) cold water
1 cup ice
1/4 cup (60ml) Apple cider vinegar

Filling
500g ripe peaches, peeled and diced (see notes for peeling tips)
2 tsp fresh thyme leaves, finely chopped
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
1/2 tsp salt
65g (1/3 cup) raw sugar
3 Tbsp Tapioca Starch

Egg wash - 1 egg whisked with 1 Tbsp water
Raw sugar, for sprinkling

 

- PROCESS -

PIE DOUGH

Place flour, sugar and salt into a large bowl. Cut butter into chunks, and add to the flour. Toss lightly to coat. Working quickly, using a pastry blender or  your fingers,  cut the butter into the flour mixture until there are only pea-sized chunks left. You want a few lumps of butter remaining to keep the pastry nice and tender.

Combine ice, water and cider vinegar in a bowl. Sprinkle a few tablespoons of the ice water into the flour and butter mixture, and using a stiff spatula or your hands, mix in well. Continue adding water a tablespoon at a time ( I normally need about 8-10 tbsp) until you have a dough that holds together well, but is not too wet. Squeeze together with your fingertips to make a homogenous dough. Shape into two rectangles, and wrap in plastic wrap. Rest in the fridge for at least two hours, or preferably overnight. 

 

FILLING AND ASSEMBLY

Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured surface, and roll into a rough rectangle that is approximately 1/8" (3mm) in thickness. Using a round cookie cutter (mine was 3 3/4" in diameter), cut circles of dough, and place them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Repeat with the second piece of dough. Press scraps together, wrap in plastic wrap, and chill for 15-20 mins, before rolling out again and cutting more circles. Store cut-out circles in the fridge while you are waiting for the scrap dough to chill. You want to aim for approximately 24 circles. 

In a medium bowl, combine the peaches, thyme leaves, vanilla bean paste and salt. Whisk the sugar and tapioca starch together in a small bowl then add to the filling mixture, and stir well to combine. 

Combine the egg and water together in a small bowl. Take one circle of dough, and place approximately 2 Tbsp of the filling in the centre. Using a pastry brush, brush egg wash around the outside edge of the dough, and top with a second circle of dough, ensuring that the air is pressed out. Lightly seal with your fingers, then transfer to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and use a fork to crimp around the edges to ensure a tight seal. 

Repeat with the remaining dough circles and filling until you have 12 hand pies. Place the baking sheet in the freezer and freeze for 30-40 minutes, or until the dough becomes very firm. If you are planning on freezing them for a longer period of time, freeze solid then transfer to an airtight plastic bag. 

While the pies are in the freezer, preheat the oven to 425˚f / 220˚c. Remove the pies from the freezer. Using a sharp knife, cut a cross in the top of each pie, brush with egg wash, and sprinkle with additional raw sugar. Bake for 25-35 minutes, until the pies are deeply golden brown and the juices are bubbling. Remove from the oven and allow to cool. Serve warm or at room temperature. Store leftovers wrapped in foil at room temperature. Reheat in the oven to help keep the pastry crispy. 

Peach and Thyme Hand pies - sweet, ripe peaches are enveloped in a tender flaky pie crust, and enhanced with the delicate flavour of thyme. #handpies #peachpies #pie #baking #peach #thyme

Cherry Pie


 
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie

Hi Hi! I am currently sitting on my butt on a plane somewhere over the middle of America, on my way back to NYC after an amazing few days in Yakima Valley, Washington. I was super stoked to be asked to attend this year’s cherry harvest with Domex Superfresh Growers - they hosted myself and a bunch of bloggers in Yakima, where we visited their orchard and factories (I popped some photos at the end of the post!), and got to learn all about their company and how they process their fruit. We toured the orchards, picked some cherries for ourselves, and then were given an amazing tour of their production facility. Each year they produce 60 million pounds of cherries - their factory is able to handle 45,000 cherries per MINUTE. The process is so amazingly streamlined, from the picking of the fruit to the shipping out from the factory, and I learnt so many interesting things and met so many amazing people! Yakima Valley is insanely beautiful and actually reminded me a whole lot of home - the town I am from in New Zealand has similar geology (I was nerding out), the same horticultural focus and produces the same things - hops, tree fruit and wine, so it was so nice to be surrounded by all these things so far away from home. 

To celebrate the trip and the cherry harvest, I have teamed up with Superfresh Growers to bring you this cherry pie recipe! I originally had something fancy and intricate planned with the fruit, but the second a giant box of the two-bite cherries showed up on my doorstep, I took one bite and knew that they were destined for pie. You really can’t beat a pie made with beautiful fresh fruit - all you need is a touch of sugar and starch, and the fruit really does shine through. The two-bite cherries really are that - big and juicy and perfect for pie. 

I kept things super simple with this pie, which I like to do when I have amazing produce, and fancied things up a little with the pie lattice instead of an intricate recipe. I have a few vintage pie tins I have been dying to use for the longest time, so instead of making one big pie I opted for four smaller pies. This recipe makes enough for four smaller 7” pies, or you can use it to make two regular 9” pies instead, whatever you feel like. I got the pie tins on Ebay - from what I saw the 7” size is a fairly standard size for vintage pie tins, so they shouldn’t be too hard to get hold of if you wanted some of your own (Looks like Amazon has them too). Cherry pie is definitely one of my new favorite things - it really is the taste of summer. Whether you go all out with fancy pie lattice or just keep it simple - it’s going to taste bomb either way. 

A few wee tips:

  • I used vintage pie tins to make these which I got on ebay - they were 7 inches across. This recipe makes four 7" pies. I measured the volume, and if you wanted, this recipe would also make 2 x regular sized 9 inch pies.
  • I love using tapioca starch in pies as it makes a super smooth filling that isn't gluey or goopy. If you don't have any, I would suggest you get some rather than substituting with corn starch - they behave differently.
  • I actually divided all the filling ingredients into four and mixed them up just before I put the lattices on each pie, because I didn't want the sugar to pull the moisture out of the fruit as it sat, meaning that the last pie would be much juicier than the first, and the starch may not distribute evenly, leading to a difference in texture of the cooked pie. 
  • I made the pies the day before I baked them and stored them in the fridge overnight before baking. The only reason I did this was because a giant rain storm came in as I was shooting and I lost my light. 30 mins in the fridge (which is what I have included in the recipe) is fine!
  • The two-bite cherries from Superfresh were exactly that - they take two bites, so I chopped them in half before making them into the filling, as large cherries can mean that they don't pack in well, and spaces between filling can lead to all sorts of pie flop problems. If your cherries are smaller and pack well, then you may not need to chop - before you mix them with the other ingredients, pour them into your pie dish and check!
  • I used cutters for the cut-outs - These are the flowers, and I have a couple of leaf sets, including these and these 
  • Make the pie dough in two batches. If you make it as one large batch you run the risk of your butter getting too hot, and overworking the dough. Making it in two batches reduces this risk.
  • I like to cut all the strips for lattices at the start, and then use the last pie to use up all the extra strips in an uneven lattice (the one with the cut-outs), but if you like then you can definitely cut them as you go. I store them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper until I am ready to use them. 
 

 

Cherry Pie

- Makes four 7 inch pies, or 2 9 inch pies -

Pie Dough
5 cups (750g) Flour
Pinch of Salt
4 tsp (16g) sugar
4 sticks (450g) cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes
1 cup (240ml) cold water
1 cup ice
1/4 cup (60ml) Apple cider vinegar

Filling
1800g two-bite cherries, pitted and cut in half (1800g is the pitted weight)
120g tapioca starch
500g raw sugar
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
1/2 tsp salt

Egg wash - 1 egg whisked with 1 Tbsp water
Raw / turbinado sugar to finish (optional)

 

- PROCESS -

PIE DOUGH

Note: I find it easiest to make the pie dough in two batches, to help keep the ingredients cold. You can make up the ice/water/apple cider vinegar mixture and use it for both the batches, but divide the other ingredients in two and make it one batch at a time. (2 1/2 cups flour, pinch of salt, 2 tsp sugar, 2 sticks (125g) butter)

Place flour, sugar and salt into a large bowl. Combine ice, water and cider vinegar in a bowl and set aside. Cut butter into chunks, and add to the flour. Toss lightly to coat. Working quickly, using a pastry blender or  your fingers,  cut the butter into the flour mixture until there are only pea-sized chunks left. You want a few lumps of butter remaining to keep the pastry nice and tender.

Sprinkle a few tablespoons of the ice water into the flour and butter mixture, and using a stiff spatula or your hands, mix in well. Continue adding water a tablespoon at a time ( I normally need about 8-10 tbsp) until you have a dough that holds together well, but is not too wet. Remember that the dough will hydrate more as you rest it, so you don't want it to be wet and sticky at this stage. Squeeze together with your fingertips to make a homogenous dough. Pat the dough into a rectangle, and wrap tightly in plastic wrap. Repeat with the second half of the ingredients. Place your dough rectangles in the fridge for at least a few hours, preferably overnight.

Remove one rectangle of dough from the fridge, unwrap, and place on a lightly floured surface. Divide into four equal pieces (if you are making two large pies, divide into two). Working with one piece at a time, roll out until slightly larger than your pie pan, and approximately 1/8 (3mm) in thickness. Line your pie pan, leaving some overhang. Place in the fridge until ready to fill. Repeat with the remaining three pie pans.

Roll out the second rectangle of dough to a large rectangle, 1/8" (3mm) in thickness. Cut your desired tops for the pies - I did a range of thicknesses of lattice strips for one pie, equally sized strips cut with a fluted cutter for another, equal sized thin strips for a double strip lattice, and some thin strips which I made into a braid to line the rim of one of the pies. I then pressed the scraps back together, rolled out, froze the dough briefly and used that to make the cut-outs. I prefer to make all the lattice strips and decorations for the top at the beginning and then go from there, but if you like you can cut off pieces of dough as you work on each lattice. 

FILLING AND ASSEMBLY

Note: If I am making individual pies with intricate lattices, I prefer to mix up the filling for each pie separately so that the cherries don't sit in the sugar and starch for too long while I am latticing each pie. I have found that if this happens the starch can be unevenly distributed, leading to fillings with different textures. For four pies, each pie would have 450g fruit, 30g tapioca starch, 125g sugar, 1/4 tsp vanilla, and a pinch of salt. 

Remove one lined pie pan from the fridge. In a small bowl, combine a quarter of the filling ingredients (see above for quantities), mix until well combined, then transfer to the lined pan. Top with desired lattice, leaving the lattice overhanging - it trims up best if it is chilled. Transfer to the fridge while you repeat the process to assemble the other three pies. 

Once you have finished decorating the pies, Remove them from the fridge one at a time, and, using a sharp knife or sharp pair of kitchen scissors, trim the bottom crust and top crust so that they are flush with the edge of the pie pan. Press down lightly to ensure the top and bottom crusts are secured. Return the pies to the fridge to chill for a further 30 minutes. 

While the pies are chilling, preheat the oven to 425˚f / 220˚c. Brush each pie lightly with egg wash, and sprinkle with additional raw sugar. Transfer to a baking sheet (you may need to bake these in two batches depending on the size of your oven - they may leak so make sure there is a sheet underneath them. See how many you can fit before egg washing). 

Bake at 425˚f / 220˚c for 20 minutes, or until the pastry is set and beginning to go golden. Reduce the temperature 375˚f / 190˚c, and bake until the pastry is deeply golden brown and the filling is bubbling. Check after 15 minutes and cover with foil if necessary, I found 20 minutes at 425˚f and then 15 minutes uncovered at 375˚f, then 15 minutes covered with foil at 375˚f worked for me, but whether you need to cover it or not depends on your preference for pastry, and your oven. Check on it and cover if needed! 

Remove from the oven and allow to cool completely on a wire rack before slicing and serving warm or at room temperature with whipped cream or ice cream. 

When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie
When you have beautiful, in season cherries, it really is a shame to do anything with it other than make Cherry Pie! These cherry pies are perfectly juicy, with the right balance of sweetness, and have a tender, flaky crust. They are easy to make, can be prepared ahead, and make the perfect summer dessert. #pie #cherrypie #recipe #darkcherrypie #fruitpie

Thank you so much to Superfresh Growers for sponsoring this post and for having me for the most amazing trip to Yakima Valley! All opinions are my own.