Rhubarb Shortcake Bars


 
Rhubarb Shortcake Bars - Two layers of sweet, short pastry enclose a jammy, rhubarb centre. These rhubarb shortcake bars differ from traditional American shortcake in that they are all baked together, giving you a range in texture - crisp pastry, soft where it hits the tart rhubarb centre, and a dusting of powdered sugar to finish. This recipe is amazingly versatile and works great with any stone fruit or berries. #rhubarb #rhubarbshortcake #shortcake #newzealandshortcake
Rhubarb Shortcake Bars - Two layers of sweet, short pastry enclose a jammy, rhubarb centre. These rhubarb shortcake bars differ from traditional American shortcake in that they are all baked together, giving you a range in texture - crisp pastry, soft where it hits the tart rhubarb centre, and a dusting of powdered sugar to finish. This recipe is amazingly versatile and works great with any stone fruit or berries. #rhubarb #rhubarbshortcake #shortcake #newzealandshortcake
Rhubarb Shortcake Bars - Two layers of sweet, short pastry enclose a jammy, rhubarb centre. These rhubarb shortcake bars differ from traditional American shortcake in that they are all baked together, giving you a range in texture - crisp pastry, soft where it hits the tart rhubarb centre, and a dusting of powdered sugar to finish. This recipe is amazingly versatile and works great with any stone fruit or berries. #rhubarb #rhubarbshortcake #shortcake #newzealandshortcake
Rhubarb Shortcake Bars - Two layers of sweet, short pastry enclose a jammy, rhubarb centre. These rhubarb shortcake bars differ from traditional American shortcake in that they are all baked together, giving you a range in texture - crisp pastry, soft where it hits the tart rhubarb centre, and a dusting of powdered sugar to finish. This recipe is amazingly versatile and works great with any stone fruit or berries. #rhubarb #rhubarbshortcake #shortcake #newzealandshortcake
Rhubarb Shortcake Bars - Two layers of sweet, short pastry enclose a jammy, rhubarb centre. These rhubarb shortcake bars differ from traditional American shortcake in that they are all baked together, giving you a range in texture - crisp pastry, soft where it hits the tart rhubarb centre, and a dusting of powdered sugar to finish. This recipe is amazingly versatile and works great with any stone fruit or berries. #rhubarb #rhubarbshortcake #shortcake #newzealandshortcake
Rhubarb Shortcake Bars - Two layers of sweet, short pastry enclose a jammy, rhubarb centre. These rhubarb shortcake bars differ from traditional American shortcake in that they are all baked together, giving you a range in texture - crisp pastry, soft where it hits the tart rhubarb centre, and a dusting of powdered sugar to finish. This recipe is amazingly versatile and works great with any stone fruit or berries. #rhubarb #rhubarbshortcake #shortcake #newzealandshortcake
Rhubarb Shortcake Bars - Two layers of sweet, short pastry enclose a jammy, rhubarb centre. These rhubarb shortcake bars differ from traditional American shortcake in that they are all baked together, giving you a range in texture - crisp pastry, soft where it hits the tart rhubarb centre, and a dusting of powdered sugar to finish. This recipe is amazingly versatile and works great with any stone fruit or berries. #rhubarb #rhubarbshortcake #shortcake #newzealandshortcake
Rhubarb Shortcake Bars - Two layers of sweet, short pastry enclose a jammy, rhubarb centre. These rhubarb shortcake bars differ from traditional American shortcake in that they are all baked together, giving you a range in texture - crisp pastry, soft where it hits the tart rhubarb centre, and a dusting of powdered sugar to finish. This recipe is amazingly versatile and works great with any stone fruit or berries. #rhubarb #rhubarbshortcake #shortcake #newzealandshortcake
Rhubarb Shortcake Bars - Two layers of sweet, short pastry enclose a jammy, rhubarb centre. These rhubarb shortcake bars differ from traditional American shortcake in that they are all baked together, giving you a range in texture - crisp pastry, soft where it hits the tart rhubarb centre, and a dusting of powdered sugar to finish. This recipe is amazingly versatile and works great with any stone fruit or berries. #rhubarb #rhubarbshortcake #shortcake #newzealandshortcake
Rhubarb Shortcake Bars - Two layers of sweet, short pastry enclose a jammy, rhubarb centre. These rhubarb shortcake bars differ from traditional American shortcake in that they are all baked together, giving you a range in texture - crisp pastry, soft where it hits the tart rhubarb centre, and a dusting of powdered sugar to finish. This recipe is amazingly versatile and works great with any stone fruit or berries. #rhubarb #rhubarbshortcake #shortcake #newzealandshortcake
Rhubarb Shortcake Bars - Two layers of sweet, short pastry enclose a jammy, rhubarb centre. These rhubarb shortcake bars differ from traditional American shortcake in that they are all baked together, giving you a range in texture - crisp pastry, soft where it hits the tart rhubarb centre, and a dusting of powdered sugar to finish. This recipe is amazingly versatile and works great with any stone fruit or berries. #rhubarb #rhubarbshortcake #shortcake #newzealandshortcake

It’s not tooo too often that I will go back and update recipes on here. I’ve read a bunch of places of people going back and re-shooting old posts, updating recipes, etc. I totally understand adding in extra SEO (because we are all slaves to google), but for me, I kinda love going back and seeing my old photos in recipes. It’s amazing to see how far I’ve come - something that I was so proud of then may look so different to something I’m proud of now, but I think, for me, that it’s nice to leave up old photos to kind of see where I started from. I’m a huge believer in “good for you, not for me”, and can totally see why people do it, I just love looking back at old stuff!

I will however, tweak recipes. If I am riffing off of a recipe (which I do a lot - looking at you, brioche dough), and I make a little change that I think makes the recipe better, or find a wee trick that makes things easier (like the mac post to end all mac posts with everything we have discovered so far), i’ll edit it. Or in the case of this Rhubarb Shortcake Bar recipe - i’ll go back and change an element to the re-tested one, because it’s easier to work with and makes the recipe better on a whole. Fun for the whole family.

These Rhubarb Shortcake bars (we call them a ‘slice’ in Nz) have been floating round in my head for a while now, and I’m so glad that I finally made them. They are a riff on this recipe, which is a version of something that I swear every Grandma in NZ had an epic recipe for - apple shortcake. Unlike shortcake in the states, this shortcake is more of a sweet, short pastry, which encases a fruity layer. You make a vanilla bean short pastry (a pate sucree), which you divide in two. You then roll it out, and place the first piece in the tin, then top it with a fruit mix, thickened with a little starch and sweetened with a little sugar. You then place the second piece of pastry on top as a lid, and bake the whole thing as one - the pastry has a teeny bit of leavener in it, which gives it a bit of rise, and the fruit filling goes somewhat like a pie filling - soft and tart and slightly thick, which is just so perfect against the pastry. These are an absolute fave of mine. I always loved the apple version as a kid, and the apricot version is so good when it is peak stone fruit season (can’t wait to make it with peaches!), but rhubarb is my forever favourite.

These are super easy to make, and I found a few wee tricks that worked for me to make them pretty foolproof. The main one is the pastry - I initally made the pastry from the apricot version (which I’ve now updated to be the same as this), and found that it wasn’t as easy to work with as I would have liked. There wasn’t enough of it, it got weird holes in it, and it was just stressful. So I changed up the method a bit, making it in the stand mixer rather than by hand, increasing the quantity, and working out a method for rolling it out and trimming it down which makes it super, super easy to make. I’ve made my fair share of rollout cookies, and always find that freezing the dough before you cut it gives you the cleanest edge, so I applied that method to this too, rolling the dough out on a piece of parchment rather than on the bench, which means you can pop it in the freezer, then once firm, trim down to exactly the right size for your pan. This means that there is no scary transfer with rolled fragile dough on a rolling pin - you can just plonk the piece of dough right down, and you are good to go!

A few wee tips:

  • I like to give the pastry a wee bit of time to chill, so that it is easier to roll out.

  • The method I have found to be easiest to roll this out and to get a nice clean cut is to roll it on a piece of parchment. I roll it out once, then kind of trim a square the size of the tin, then cut the excess off, and squish it back onto the square, and re-roll to make it a bit thicker. Probably not technical, but it is the least wasteful way, and you end up with as thick of a piece of pastry as possible!

  • Because of my squish and roll technique (that’s the technical term), the bottom of the piece of pastry is probably going to be the smoothest, so once you have trimmed it, you can flip it if you want to make sure the smooth piece is facing up. This isn’t as important on the bottom, but I like to have the top piece with it’s neatest part showing, so I just pop another piece of parchment on top, and flip it before I transfer it. If your dough is cold, this is easy - pop it back in the freezer for a bit if you are worried.

  • If you’re good with pastry you probably don’t have to muck around with my freezing and scoring, but it means that you get a super straight edge, and it’s all as neat as possible. Takes a bit of fluffing around, but it’s so satisfying!

  • I used a little stencil I made on the laser cutter when I was dusting these - you could use an old piece of lace, or just a solid dusting of powdered sugar is great too! Funny wee story - I was racing light when I made these and didn’t have any powdered sugar, so what you see is corn starch! hahaha. We just blew it off once we were done before we ate them!

 

 

Rhubarb Shortcake Bars

- Makes 12 large bars -

Sweet Pastry
190g unsalted butter, at room temperature
150g sugar
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
450g all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt

Rhubarb Filling
750g trimmed rhubarb, chopped into 1/2” pieces
80g sugar
2 Tbsp tapioca starch
1/2 tsp salt

Powdered Sugar to dust

 

- PROCESS -

SWEET PASTRY

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter and sugar for 2-3 minutes, until pale and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing to combine before adding the next. Scrape down the bowl. Add the vanilla and mix to incorporate.

Add the flour, baking powder, and salt, and mix just to bring the dough together. Turn out onto a work surface, and bring the dough together lightly with your hands. Divide evenly into two pieces, flatten into rough square shapes, wrap tightly in plastic, and rest in the fridge for an hour.

FILLING AND ASSEMBLY

Preheat the oven to 350°f / 180°c. Line a 9” square baking tin with two pieces of parchment paper, forming a “sling” so that you can easily remove the bars.

Roll out the first piece of pastry on a piece of parchment paper. Measure the size of the tin against the pastry, then trim the edges, and place the excess onto the piece of pastry, and roll out again to smooth - this ensures that your pastry is as thick as possible. Transfer to the freezer for 5 minutes, or until firmed up slightly. Remove from the freezer, and using the tin as a guide, trim to a 9” square. Place in the bottom of the baking tin, trimming if needed.

Combine all the filling ingredients in a large bowl, and toss to combine. Place on top of the pastry in the baking tin, flattening down with your hands or the bottom of a glass.

Repeat the rolling process with the second piece of pastry, and place on top of the rhubarb mixture.

Bake for 45-50 minutes, until the pastry is golden and the fruit is bubbling. Allow to cool completely in the tin before removing using the slings. Dust with powdered sugar, then slice with a sharp knife.

Store at room temperature covered lightly with a cloth or paper towel - they will go soggy if stored in an airtight container.

Rhubarb Shortcake Bars - Two layers of sweet, short pastry enclose a jammy, rhubarb centre. These rhubarb shortcake bars differ from traditional American shortcake in that they are all baked together, giving you a range in texture - crisp pastry, soft where it hits the tart rhubarb centre, and a dusting of powdered sugar to finish. This recipe is amazingly versatile and works great with any stone fruit or berries. #rhubarb #rhubarbshortcake #shortcake #newzealandshortcake shortcake bars.jpg

Mini Banana Bundt Cakes with Coffee Salted Caramel


 
Banana mini bundt cakes, made in a mini brilliance pan, finished with a coffee infused salted caramel. The perfect treat to have with your coffee. #bananabundt #bananacake #coffeecaramel
Banana mini bundt cakes, made in a mini brilliance pan, finished with a coffee infused salted caramel. The perfect treat to have with your coffee. #bananabundt #bananacake #coffeecaramel
Banana mini bundt cakes, made in a mini brilliance pan, finished with a coffee infused salted caramel. The perfect treat to have with your coffee. #bananabundt #bananacake #coffeecaramel
Banana mini bundt cakes, made in a mini brilliance pan, finished with a coffee infused salted caramel. The perfect treat to have with your coffee. #bananabundt #bananacake #coffeecaramel
Banana mini bundt cakes, made in a mini brilliance pan, finished with a coffee infused salted caramel. The perfect treat to have with your coffee. #bananabundt #bananacake #coffeecaramel
Banana mini bundt cakes, made in a mini brilliance pan, finished with a coffee infused salted caramel. The perfect treat to have with your coffee. #bananabundt #bananacake #coffeecaramel
Banana mini bundt cakes, made in a mini brilliance pan, finished with a coffee infused salted caramel. The perfect treat to have with your coffee. #bananabundt #bananacake #coffeecaramel

I am an absolute shocker at buying bananas and then not eating them, which results in more banana baked goods than bananas being eaten in this household. I always have good intentions to make smoothies, or have them as a snack with some nut butter (which I love, I just always forget), so they inevitably end up weird and spotty, and I bake with them. It’s not the worst problem to have, seeing as I am married to someone with a banana bread addiction, so we always have some on hand in the freezer, pre-sliced, so rich can just pop it in the toaster when the need arises.

I’ve been wanting to work on a banana bundt cake for a while now, and a week or so ago we had an intense backlog of brown bananas, so I started testing. The testing process was actually quite quick, as my go-to banana cake recipe, which I use for a regular layer cake (super old photos, please excuse) and also a sheet cake, bundted like a champ, and I hardly had to make any tweaks. It’s always a little hit and miss when you try baking a recipe you know in a bundt pan - it either is a spectacular fail (like the first test of this cake), or it works first time and all is right with the world (this devil’s food bundt did exactly that and it was just the best day ever).

I topped these mini banana bundt cakes with a coffee caramel - infusing caramel is super easy as it is cream based, so to inject flavour all you have to do is infuse the cream. This time I steeped it with some coffee, and it came out great. Always remember that the flavour will be diluted once it is made into a caramel - I always get a bit worried for a second when the cream is super strong! The caramel was so lovely against the banana, and the coffee flavour complimented it perfectly. You definitely don’t need a caramel topping, but it looks amazing and is a little something extra!

I originally tested this in a regular sized bundt pan (I used this one), and it worked great, so if you don’t have these mini babies, then you can double the recipe - I have popped some instructions in the notes.

A few wee tips:

  • I made a single batch of this recipe twice so that I had 12 little cakes. I found flour settled in the grooves, so I just used some baking spray to help prevent sticking. I used this pan!

  • If you would like, you can double it and put it in a 10 cup bundt pan (I tested it in this), and bake for 55-60 minutes. Leave to stand for 10 min before turning out. Make sure the pan is well greased with baking spray and flour.

  • I like to give the caramel an overnight rest, which means it will likely have to be microwaved to get to the right texture once you are ready to use it, but if you like you can also make it before you make the cakes and leave it to cool while you bake them - if you put it in a shallow container to cool (rather than a jar) it will cool quicker because it has more surface area! I usually just pop it in a jar and leave in the fridge overnight because #lazy.

  • You want your bananas to be waaay on the ripe side for this if possible. Like, if you look at them and are like “ooooh that’s almost rotten” - that’s great. Regular spotty bananas work too!

  • This recipe has a slightly weird step in it - it gets you to dissolve baking soda in milk. This is how I’ve always done it, because this cake is adapted from the banana cake I grew up on. I think it may be to reduce the risk of baking soda bombs in the cake (when you bite into a lump), I guess NZ bakers are bad at sifting their baking soda, or it is to help it disperse? Anyway, it’s there because that’s how I’ve always done it, would love to know if you know the reason! If you don’t want to do this step you can probably just add the baking soda to the dry ingredients, and add the milk along with the vanilla and banana.

 

 

Mini Banana Bundt Cakes with Coffee Salted Caramel

- Makes 6 cakes -

Note: I made this recipe twice in order to give me 12 cakes - I baked them, then let the pan cool while I mixed up the next batch.

Cake adapted from "Edmonds Cookbook"

Coffee Salted Caramel
230g heavy cream
30g coarsely ground coffee
200g sugar
90g butter, at room temperature
2 tsp kosher salt

Banana Mini Bundt Cakes
125g butter, at room temperature
150g sugar
2 eggs, at room temperature
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
225g very ripe bananas (about two bananas), mashed
40g whole milk
1 tsp baking soda
250g all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
 

- PROCESS -

COFFEE SALTED CARAMEL

Place the cream in a small saucepan. Heat over gentle heat, until you start to see movement around the edges. Remove from the heat and add the ground coffee, stirring to combine. Cover, and steep for 20 minutes. Strain the cream through a fine mesh sieve, pressing down to get as much infused cream out as possible. Clean the saucepan. Weigh the cream, and top up to 120g if needed. Place over a low heat while you prepare the caramel.

Place the sugar in a medium sized heavy bottom saucepan. Heat on medium, stirring constantly. The sugar will start to form clumps, then begin to melt. Cook until is it amber in colour, then remove from the heat and immediately add all of the butter. Be careful as the caramel will bubble rapidly. Once the butter is incorporated, add the infused cream and stir well. Stir in the salt, and pour into a glass jar. Allow to cool completely - either in the fridge overnight, or for a few hours.

BANANA MINI BUNDT CAKES

Preheat the oven to 350°f / 180°c.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter and sugar on high speed until light and fluffy, 3-4 minutes. Add the eggs one at a time, mixing until incorporated before adding the next. Add the vanilla bean paste and mashed bananas, and mix to combine.

Warm up the milk either in the microwave or in a very small pan, then add the baking soda and mix to dissolve. Add to the mixture and beat to combine.

In a small bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Add to the mixer, and mix on low until just combined.

Spray a 6-well bundt cakelet pan with baking spray (see notes on making this a full sized bundt cake), and evenly divide the batter between them. Tap firmly on the bench to help remove any air bubbles. Place on a sheet pan.

Bake the mini bundt cakes for 30 to 35 minutes, until golden brown. Remove from the oven and allow to stand for 10 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack and allowing to cool completely.

ASSEMBLY

Place the cooled bundts on a wire rack over a baking sheet. If your caramel has cooled, warm it up in the microwave slightly until it is a pouring consistency.

Drizzle the cakes with the coffee caramel, and finish with sea salt if desired.

Store leftovers in an airtight container at room temperature. If you aren’t planning on eating them all at once, you can store the caramel and cakes separately and assemble before eating to prevent them going too soggy.

Banana mini bundt cakes, made in a mini brilliance pan, finished with a coffee infused salted caramel. The perfect treat to have with your coffee. #bananabundt #bananacake #coffeecaramel

Lemon and Sour Cream Loaf Cake with Lemon Glaze


 
Lemon and Sour Cream Loaf Cake with Lemon Glaze. This stir together loaf cake has a beautifully tender crumb from the sour cream, and is brushed with a lemon syrup and finished with a lemon glaze for a perfect, punchy lemon flavour. This super easy baking project is perfect for a weekend, or for when you need a simple but delicious lemon cake recipe. #lemoncake #loafcake #lemonsourcream
Lemon and Sour Cream Loaf Cake with Lemon Glaze. This stir together loaf cake has a beautifully tender crumb from the sour cream, and is brushed with a lemon syrup and finished with a lemon glaze for a perfect, punchy lemon flavour. This super easy baking project is perfect for a weekend, or for when you need a simple but delicious lemon cake recipe. #lemoncake #loafcake #lemonsourcream
Lemon and Sour Cream Loaf Cake with Lemon Glaze. This stir together loaf cake has a beautifully tender crumb from the sour cream, and is brushed with a lemon syrup and finished with a lemon glaze for a perfect, punchy lemon flavour. This super easy baking project is perfect for a weekend, or for when you need a simple but delicious lemon cake recipe. #lemoncake #loafcake #lemonsourcream
Lemon and Sour Cream Loaf Cake with Lemon Glaze. This stir together loaf cake has a beautifully tender crumb from the sour cream, and is brushed with a lemon syrup and finished with a lemon glaze for a perfect, punchy lemon flavour. This super easy baking project is perfect for a weekend, or for when you need a simple but delicious lemon cake recipe. #lemoncake #loafcake #lemonsourcream
Lemon and Sour Cream Loaf Cake with Lemon Glaze. This stir together loaf cake has a beautifully tender crumb from the sour cream, and is brushed with a lemon syrup and finished with a lemon glaze for a perfect, punchy lemon flavour. This super easy baking project is perfect for a weekend, or for when you need a simple but delicious lemon cake recipe. #lemoncake #loafcake #lemonsourcream
Lemon and Sour Cream Loaf Cake with Lemon Glaze. This stir together loaf cake has a beautifully tender crumb from the sour cream, and is brushed with a lemon syrup and finished with a lemon glaze for a perfect, punchy lemon flavour. This super easy baking project is perfect for a weekend, or for when you need a simple but delicious lemon cake recipe. #lemoncake #loafcake #lemonsourcream

I know you’re probably in the middle of Easter baking and food planning, but I just wanted to slide this in here in case you needed a quick wee weekend (or anytime) baking project. I posted a while back on IG about revamping this loaf cake to include a lemon version, which I attempted last week. After about four tweaks, I realised that it wasn’t the right base recipe to be using for a lemon loaf cake - in order to get enough lemon flavour in, I was having to up the liquid to a level that was making the cake super oily and weird. So I bailed on the ricotta idea, and went in the direction of lemon and sour cream, which is one of my fave combos.

Lemon and sour cream isn’t the first combination that comes to mind when you think of lemon, but it makes a lot of sense - the smooth flavour of the sour cream plays with the tartness of the lemon juice and lemon zest. The moisture gives the cake a beautifully tender crumb, which is enhanced by the melted butter and almond meal also in the batter. This is a quick stir together cake, which, once baked, is doused in an easy lemon syrup, which again lends more moisture and helps elevate the punchy flavour of the lemon. I then finished the whole thing with a thick lemony glaze.

I know I say this about almost everything that I make, but this is definitely going to become a firm favourite around here. One of my goals this year was to share some ‘simple’ recipes alongside the multi component ones that I often gravitate toward - recipes that can be made without a stand mixer, or without any fancy ingredients or kitchen equipment (I don’t consider a scale to be fancy, if you don’t have one already you better get on it). This cake is made with just two bowls and a whisk, meaning it is super easy to throw together, regardless of your kitchen situation. Happy loaf caking! x

A few wee tips:

  • I ran out of sour cream during one of the tests, so I subbed some full fat greek yoghurt and it worked great. Creme fraiche would also work - you just want something of a similar consistency and moisture / fat content (so no buttermilk or cream cheese etc).

  • When you line the pan for this, make sure that you have some overhang so that you have something to pull the cake out of the pan with. I like to clip down the parchment paper with some small bulldog clips while I transfer the batter to the loaf pan, but make sure that you take them off before baking - i’ve baked clips into a cake before, and it’s not super cute.

  • If you like, you can finish this with some lemon zest.

  • I like adding the syrup while the cake is still a bit warm, so that it absorbs it nicely, but wait until it is properly cooled before adding the lemon glaze, so that it does not run off the cake. The glaze will look super rough when you first put it on, but it will settle and become smooth in a minute or two.

  • I like my glaze to be quite thick - but by all means feel free to make yours a little thinner if you like. I usually start with 30g of lemon juice, mix it until fully incorporated, then add more just a little squeeze at a time. You need the glaze to be thicker than you think or it goes everywhere.

 

 

Lemon and Sour Cream Loaf Cake with Lemon Glaze

- Makes one loaf cake -

Lemon Sour Cream Cake
225g sugar
Zest of 3 lemons
290g all-purpose flour
90g almond meal (almond flour)
3/4 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp plus 1/8 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
175g unsalted butter, melted and cooled
135g freshly squeezed lemon juice
3 eggs
150g full fat sour cream, at room temperature
1 tsp vanilla bean paste

Lemon Syrup
60g lemon juice
50g sugar

Lemon Glaze
200g powdered sugar, sifted
30g lemon juice, plus additional if needed (see notes) 

- PROCESS -

LEMON AND SOUR CREAM CAKE

Preheat the oven to 350°f / 180°c. Grease a one pound loaf pan, and line with a parchment paper sling. (9” x 4 1/2” x 2 3/4” is what I used. Larger will work, but do not go smaller than this or it will spill in the oven - happened to me and it’s not ideal. haha)

Place the sugar into a large bowl, then zest the lemon directly into the bowl. Using your fingers, rub the lemon zest into the sugar until incorporated. Add the flour, almond meal, baking powder, baking soda, and salt, and whisk to combine.

In a medium bowl, combine the melted butter, lemon juice, eggs, sour cream, and vanilla bean paste, and mix to combine. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and whisk until completely incorporated. Finish with a rubber spatula if needed to ensure that there are no dry ingredients left on the bottom.

Transfer the mixture to the lined loaf pan, smoothing with an offset spatula or back of a spoon. Place onto a sheet pan (optional step but I like doing it just in case).

Bake the loaf cake for 60 to 70 minutes, or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean, checking for doneness after 50 minutes and tenting with foil if needed to stop the top of the loaf from browning excessively. Remove from the oven and allow to stand in the pan for 5-10 minutes, before brushing with the lemon syrup (recipe follows). Leave to stand for a further 5 to 10 minutes, brushing additional syrup on if it seems to be absorbing, then remove from the pan and allow to cool completely on a wire rack.

Using a spoon or offset spatula, spread with the glaze (recipe follows). Allow 10-15 minutes for it to set slightly before serving. Garnish with additional zest if desired. Slice thickly using a sharp bread knife.

Leftovers can be wrapped or stored in an airtight container at room temperature.

 
LEMON SYRUP

Place the lemon juice and syrup in a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir to combine, then heat until the sugar has dissolved. Bring the mixture to a gentle boil, then simmer for 2 minutes to allow it to reduce slightly. Allow to stand for 5-10 minutes to cool slightly.

LEMON GLAZE

In a small bowl, combine the powdered sugar and lemon juice. Stir until well combined, then add more lemon juice a small squeeze at a time until you have a thick glaze (you need it to be thicker than you think so it doesn’t run). Spread onto the cake.

Lemon and Sour Cream Loaf Cake with Lemon Glaze. This stir together loaf cake has a beautifully tender crumb from the sour cream, and is brushed with a lemon syrup and finished with a lemon glaze for a perfect, punchy lemon flavour. This super easy baking project is perfect for a weekend, or for when you need a simple but delicious lemon cake recipe. #lemoncake #loafcake #lemonsourcream