Lemon Crullers with Lemon and Honey Glaze


 
Lemon Crullers with Lemon and Honey Glaze - Fluffy, crispy lemon scented crullers are dipped in a lemon and honey glaze and finished with delicate gold leaf. Crullers are made by frying choux dough, and are a must-try if you haven't made them before! #crullers #doughnut #lemoncruller
Lemon Crullers with Lemon and Honey Glaze - Fluffy, crispy lemon scented crullers are dipped in a lemon and honey glaze and finished with delicate gold leaf. Crullers are made by frying choux dough, and are a must-try if you haven't made them before! #crullers #doughnut #lemoncruller
Lemon Crullers with Lemon and Honey Glaze - Fluffy, crispy lemon scented crullers are dipped in a lemon and honey glaze and finished with delicate gold leaf. Crullers are made by frying choux dough, and are a must-try if you haven't made them before! #crullers #doughnut #lemoncruller
Lemon Crullers with Lemon and Honey Glaze - Fluffy, crispy lemon scented crullers are dipped in a lemon and honey glaze and finished with delicate gold leaf. Crullers are made by frying choux dough, and are a must-try if you haven't made them before! #crullers #doughnut #lemoncruller
Lemon Crullers with Lemon and Honey Glaze - Fluffy, crispy lemon scented crullers are dipped in a lemon and honey glaze and finished with delicate gold leaf. Crullers are made by frying choux dough, and are a must-try if you haven't made them before! #crullers #doughnut #lemoncruller
Lemon Crullers with Lemon and Honey Glaze - Fluffy, crispy lemon scented crullers are dipped in a lemon and honey glaze and finished with delicate gold leaf. Crullers are made by frying choux dough, and are a must-try if you haven't made them before! #crullers #doughnut #lemoncruller
Lemon Crullers with Lemon and Honey Glaze - Fluffy, crispy lemon scented crullers are dipped in a lemon and honey glaze and finished with delicate gold leaf. Crullers are made by frying choux dough, and are a must-try if you haven't made them before! #crullers #doughnut #lemoncruller
Lemon Crullers with Lemon and Honey Glaze - Fluffy, crispy lemon scented crullers are dipped in a lemon and honey glaze and finished with delicate gold leaf. Crullers are made by frying choux dough, and are a must-try if you haven't made them before! #crullers #doughnut #lemoncruller

Hi hi! Continuing on my ‘must fry everything’ kick from last week, I am super jazzed to share this lemon cruller recipe with a super simple lemon and honey glaze. If you haven’t had a cruller before they are essentially fried choux dough (same as what is used for eclairs, which I still need to make), and they are ridiculously delicious. The great part about making choux dough is that you can make a whole bunch of different things all in one go, and it freezes super well, so if you don’t want 14 crullers all at once (not the worst thing to have happened to me), you can freeze some, or pipe some out into cream puffs or eclairs, and have a whole little choux family!

I kept things nice and easy this time, adding a little lemon zest to the choux dough, and dipping them in a lemon and honey glaze. My initial batch I was having super intense sog issues with, which I realised was from adding honey to the dough - the sugar was causing them to brown too fast, leaving me with an undercooked inside, soggy crullers, and seriously bummed out. Once I realised that I needed to nix the honey in the dough itself and just keep it in the glaze, and up the oil temp a bit, we were away laughing!

Like I mentioned earlier, I recently got a new deep fryer, which I am finding super useful to make doughnuts, as it saves a whole lot of fluffing around with oil temperatures. However, until now I had just been using a dutch oven and a thermometer, and it worked great - you just have to make sure that you are checking the oil between each batch. It may help to fry less at a time too to help you control this. Both methods work great!

A few wee tips:

  • I have included an extra 'just in case' egg in the ingredients. The reason that this is in there, is that sometimes you need to add extra egg to the pastry if necessary. You want the mixture to be at a consistency where if you dip in the beater of the mixer, the batter will form a 'v' shape and eventually break off. If it is too stiff, and breaks off very quickly, you may need to add another beaten egg, and mix again, before performing the test. 

  • I started making these by drawing a circle on each square of parchment paper, which takes way longer than it needs to. I watched a video and had a small mind blowing revelation - instead of drawing on each individual square of parchment, you draw on one, then use that as a template. When you pipe, you place the piece of parchment you are going to use over the master template, then pipe a circle, following the template, then pop it onto the sheet pan, and place the next piece over the master template. This way you only have to draw one circle, which you use over and over! Game changer.

  • Make sure that you do a test cruller when it comes to frying - if the oil is too cool they will go soggy or not cook properly inside, causing them to collapse. Test one, then take it out of the oil and rest for a few minutes to ensure that it does not collapse. If it does, it is not properly cooked inside - either increase your cooking time, or increase your oil temperature.

 

 

Lemon Crullers with Lemon and Honey Glaze

- Makes about 14 Crullers -

Lemon Crullers
125g whole milk
125g water
110g unsalted butter, cut into cubes
20g sugar
5g kosher salt
5g vanilla bean paste
Zest of 2 Lemons finely grated
175g all-purpose flour
240g egg, lightly beaten, plus one extra egg if needed (see notes)
Neutral oil for frying

Lemon Honey Glaze
300g powdered sugar, sifted
45g lemon juice
30g honey
1 tsp vanilla bean paste

Gold Leaf to finish, optional

 

- PROCESS -

LEMON CRULLERS

Cut about 14 or 15 squares of parchment paper approximately 3” x 3”. Using a cookie cutter or other circular tool, draw a circle 2 1/2” diameter on a piece of paper. This will be your master template (See notes). Fit a large piping bag with a closed star tip (I used an ateco #847)

In a medium heavy bottomed saucepan, combine the milk, water, butter, sugar, salt, vanilla bean paste, and lemon zest. Place over medium heat, and stir until the butter has melted and the mixture has begun to boil. Remove from the heat, and add the flour all at once, mixing quickly with a wooden spoon to combine. The mixture will form a thick paste. 

Return to the heat, and, stirring constantly, cook the mixture for 2 minutes to help dry it out. Transfer to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix on medium speed for 1 minute to help cool down the mixture. 

With the mixture running on low, slowly stream in the 240g egg. Mix on medium speed for 4 minutes, or until the egg is fully incorporated. Test the consistency of the batter by dipping in the beater and pulling up. If it forms a v which eventually breaks off, you are good to go. If it seems too stiff, slowly add another beaten egg and mix to incorporate. 

Transfer the choux pastry to the prepared piping bag. Using your traced circle as a guide, pipe circles onto the parchment paper squares, ending each with a little flick of your wrist. Place on a baking sheet. Repeat with the rest of the dough - the parchment squares can overlap a little. Transfer to the freezer and freeze for an hour.

About 20 minutes before the hour is up, fill a heavy bottomed saucepan or cast iron dutch oven with about 4 inches of oil. Heat over medium until it registers 375˚f (190˚c) on a candy thermometer. Alternatively you can use a deep fryer. Place a cooling rack on a sheet pan.

Working in batches, frying two to three doughnuts at a time, peel them off the paper and carefully lower into the oil. Fry for approximately 7 minutes, turning often to ensure even cooking, until golden brown. Remove from the oil and allow to drain on the wire rack. Repeat with the remaining doughnuts - leave them in the freezer until you fry them.  Cool before glazing.

GLAZE

Place the cooled doughnuts on a wire rack. Dunk one at a time in the glaze, allow additional glaze to drip off, and then place on the wire rack. Repeat with the remaining doughnuts. Finish with gold leaf if desired.

Best eaten on the day that they are made. Store leftovers at room temperature.

Lemon Crullers with Lemon and Honey Glaze - Fluffy, crispy lemon scented crullers are dipped in a lemon and honey glaze and finished with delicate gold leaf. Crullers are made by frying choux dough, and are a must-try if you haven't made them before! #crullers #doughnut #lemoncruller

Mini Cinnamon Sugar Brioche Doughnuts


 
Fluffy miniature brioche doughnuts - an easy brioche dough is given an overnight rise, then rolled out and cut into tiny, perfect doughnuts, which are fried until golden brown, then rolled in cinnamon sugar. The perfect mouthful of fluffy doughnut, and sweet, spicy sugar. #briochedoughnut #cinnamonsugar #yeastdoughnut
Fluffy miniature brioche doughnuts - an easy brioche dough is given an overnight rise, then rolled out and cut into tiny, perfect doughnuts, which are fried until golden brown, then rolled in cinnamon sugar. The perfect mouthful of fluffy doughnut, and sweet, spicy sugar. #briochedoughnut #cinnamonsugar #yeastdoughnut
Fluffy miniature brioche doughnuts - an easy brioche dough is given an overnight rise, then rolled out and cut into tiny, perfect doughnuts, which are fried until golden brown, then rolled in cinnamon sugar. The perfect mouthful of fluffy doughnut, and sweet, spicy sugar. #briochedoughnut #cinnamonsugar #yeastdoughnut
Fluffy miniature brioche doughnuts - an easy brioche dough is given an overnight rise, then rolled out and cut into tiny, perfect doughnuts, which are fried until golden brown, then rolled in cinnamon sugar. The perfect mouthful of fluffy doughnut, and sweet, spicy sugar. #briochedoughnut #cinnamonsugar #yeastdoughnut
Fluffy miniature brioche doughnuts - an easy brioche dough is given an overnight rise, then rolled out and cut into tiny, perfect doughnuts, which are fried until golden brown, then rolled in cinnamon sugar. The perfect mouthful of fluffy doughnut, and sweet, spicy sugar. #briochedoughnut #cinnamonsugar #yeastdoughnut
Fluffy miniature brioche doughnuts - an easy brioche dough is given an overnight rise, then rolled out and cut into tiny, perfect doughnuts, which are fried until golden brown, then rolled in cinnamon sugar. The perfect mouthful of fluffy doughnut, and sweet, spicy sugar. #briochedoughnut #cinnamonsugar #yeastdoughnut
Fluffy miniature brioche doughnuts - an easy brioche dough is given an overnight rise, then rolled out and cut into tiny, perfect doughnuts, which are fried until golden brown, then rolled in cinnamon sugar. The perfect mouthful of fluffy doughnut, and sweet, spicy sugar. #briochedoughnut #cinnamonsugar #yeastdoughnut
Fluffy miniature brioche doughnuts - an easy brioche dough is given an overnight rise, then rolled out and cut into tiny, perfect doughnuts, which are fried until golden brown, then rolled in cinnamon sugar. The perfect mouthful of fluffy doughnut, and sweet, spicy sugar. #briochedoughnut #cinnamonsugar #yeastdoughnut

Hi! Happy Sunday! Things have been same old same old round here, buuuuut I just got a deep fryer a few weeks ago, so I have been on a mission to fry alllll of the things! I love making doughnuts, and have been tossing up with the idea of getting one for a while now, and I finally bit the bullet and ordered one, and it has been a GAME CHANGER. I got a pretty small one (NYC life), but I love how evenly it holds the temperature, meaning I don’t have to fuss lots with measuring each time, and it has a nice little basket, which fulfills my childhood dream of working in a fish and chip shop! Until now I have been using a cast iron dutch oven and a thermometer, which also works super well, so whatever you have, use it! It’s worth it for doughnuts.

As part of my quest to fry all of the things (there’s an epic cruller recipe coming your way next week too), I figured it was about time I finally posted a mini version of my fave doughnut recipe! I have been meaning to make these for a while now, and then recently the lovely Sarah posted some on Instagram, and I haven’t been able to stop thinking about them since, so here we are! I grew up with mini doughnuts as a treat - Mum sometimes used to bring them home from the supermarket, and we would heat them until they were semi-nuclear, then have them as an after school snack. I stuck with the classic cinnamon sugar coating, although you could toss these in anything that you like!

This is literally my regular brioche recipe (that I use in about every third post, she’s a versatile wee thing), but made into little doughnuts. That’s it! They are yum. I’m a big fan of cinnamon sugar, and so these are a great way to get that ideal cinnamon sugar : doughnut ratio. You should make them.

A few wee tips:

  • Chilled dough is easiest to work with and cut out, so I recommend giving these an overnight rise in the fridge if you can. Alternatively you could roll it out, place it on a sheet pan (you may need to divide it in two), cover with plastic wrap, and pop in the freezer for 15-20 minutes to help firm up.

  • If you choose not to do the overnight rise, I would recommend popping the cut out doughnuts on small squares of parchment paper, so that you can avoid touching the dough when transferring to the fryer or pot, which may leave little dents. You just stick the whole thing, paper and all, into the pot, then remove the paper with tongs! I find this a bit labour intensive so I often skip it, but if you are worried about mis-shapen doughnuts, you might want to include this step!

  • You will need a thermometer for frying. I like using a dutch oven too because they retain heat well. Check the temperature of the oil before each batch - too hot and the insides don’t cook in time, and too cool and the doughnuts soak up oil.

  • I love these heavy on the cinnamon, so dial it back a bit if you don’t!

 

 

Mini Cinnamon Sugar Brioche Doughnuts

- Makes about 40 doughnuts -

Doughnut dough
1 envelope (2 1/4 tsp) active dry yeast
250g (1 cup) whole milk, lukewarm
4 Tbsp (50g) sugar
565g (3 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour
1 tsp salt
2 eggs, at room temperature
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
90g (6 tbsp) unsalted butter, at room temperature

Neutral oil for frying

Cinnamon Sugar
200g granulated sugar
3 Tbsp cinnamon (reduce this slightly if you don’t like strong cinnamon flavour)
1/4 tsp vanilla powder (optional)

 

- PROCESS -

DOUGHNUTS

In a small bowl, combine the yeast, milk and 2 Tbsp of the sugar. Mix well, and leave to sit for 10-15 minutes, or until foamy.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine the flour, salt, and remaining 2 Tbsp sugar. Mix briefly to combine. Add the eggs, vanilla, and foamy yeast mixture to the bowl. Mix on low for 2-3 minutes, until the dough is starting to come together. It may look slightly dry but do not worry - it will mix together nicely in the next steps. Increase the mixer speed to medium, and mix for another 10 minutes, until the dough is soft and smooth.

Reduce the mixer speed to low, and add the butter a little at a time, waiting until it is fully incorporated into the dough before adding the next piece. This process should take 3-4 minutes. Once the butter is fully incorporated, increase the mixer speed to medium, and mix for a further 5 minutes, until the dough is very soft and smooth.

Transfer to an oiled bowl, and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Place overnight in the fridge to rise (see notes)

Line two sheet pans with parchment paper. Turn the dough out onto a well floured surface. Roll until it is 1/2” thickness.

Using a 1 3/4” round cutter, cut out circles of dough. Using a very small round cutter or a milkshake straw (I used a metal bubble tea straw), cut a circle out of the middle of each round of dough. Place onto the lined sheet pan. Repeat until you have cut out all of the dough - scraps can be pressed together and re-rolled. I like to use the scrap ones for the first test fry, as they sometimes turn out a little wonky.

Lightly cover the cut-out doughnuts with plastic wrap, and leave to rise for 45-50 minutes, until puffy. When you poke them lightly with your finger, it should leave a small indentation that springs back.

In the last 15-20 minutes of the doughnuts proofing, heat neutral oil to 350°f / 180°c in a large heavy-bottomed pot (cast iron works great). Place a wire rack over a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Combine all the ingredients for the cinnamon sugar in a medium bowl.

Once the oil has come to temperature, test it with a few scraps of dough, or your doughnuts you cut from the re-rolled dough. Gently lower the doughnuts, up to six at a time (depending on the size of your pot), into the hot oil. Cook , flipping every 30 seconds, for 3-4 minutes, until golden brown. Remove from the oil using a slotted spoon and place on a cooling rack. Allow to cool for 30 seconds before tossing in the sugar. Repeat the process with the rest of the doughnuts.

Best eaten the day that they are made, but leftovers can be stored in an airtight container and briefly reheated in the microwave before eating.

Fluffy miniature brioche doughnuts - an easy brioche dough is given an overnight rise, then rolled out and cut into tiny, perfect doughnuts, which are fried until golden brown, then rolled in cinnamon sugar. The perfect mouthful of fluffy doughnut, and sweet, spicy sugar. #briochedoughnut #cinnamonsugar #yeastdoughnut

Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling


 
Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling from Alana Kysar's new book, Aloha Kitchen. Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts, which are soft and fluffy. They are fried off, then rolled in sugar, then filled with a silky liliko'i pastry cream. These are the perfect indulgent treat, and are super easy to make. #malasadas #doughnuts #lilikoi #passionfruit
Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling from Alana Kysar's new book, Aloha Kitchen. Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts, which are soft and fluffy. They are fried off, then rolled in sugar, then filled with a silky liliko'i pastry cream. These are the perfect indulgent treat, and are super easy to make. #malasadas #doughnuts #lilikoi #passionfruit
Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling from Alana Kysar's new book, Aloha Kitchen. Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts, which are soft and fluffy. They are fried off, then rolled in sugar, then filled with a silky liliko'i pastry cream. These are the perfect indulgent treat, and are super easy to make. #malasadas #doughnuts #lilikoi #passionfruit
Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling from Alana Kysar's new book, Aloha Kitchen. Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts, which are soft and fluffy. They are fried off, then rolled in sugar, then filled with a silky liliko'i pastry cream. These are the perfect indulgent treat, and are super easy to make. #malasadas #doughnuts #lilikoi #passionfruit
Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling from Alana Kysar's new book, Aloha Kitchen. Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts, which are soft and fluffy. They are fried off, then rolled in sugar, then filled with a silky liliko'i pastry cream. These are the perfect indulgent treat, and are super easy to make. #malasadas #doughnuts #lilikoi #passionfruit

Hi hi! My sweet friend Alana wrote a cookbook, and I am so, so excited to be sharing a recipe from it today! Although Alana and I have never actually met IRL (story of my life, this is what happens when you’re a hermit and lots of your friends don’t live in NYC), but we have been internet friends for a few years now, and I was so stoked to get a copy of her new beautiful book, Aloha Kitchen, in the mail recently!

Alana is originally from Hawai’i, and her book not only gives you an incredible history of Hawai’i, the food, and all the cultures that have made it their home, but it is filled with the most beautiful food and recipes. Most people don’t realise just how diverse the food in Hawai’i really is, and this is reflected so, so perfectly in the book. I can’t wait to explore it a little more - the book is already filled with post it notes. Congrats lady, the book is so incredible! x

I thought I was going to have a tough time choosing a recipe to share from the book, but as soon as I came across this recipe for Malasadas with Liliko’i Pastry Cream, my decision was made incredibly easily. I think we all know by now my obsession for a) doughnuts and b) passionfruit / liliko’i, and this ticks both boxes. Passionfruit is super hard to come by in NYC, so when we went to Hawai’i with family a few years ago, it took us a few days to realise that Liliko’i were passionfruit - they are round and yellow in Hawai’i, whereas they are weird purple shrivelled things in NZ, so we didn’t put two and two together! When we did realise, we went on a mad mission to buy a bunch from the local farmer’s market to bring back to NYC, stupidly not realising we weren’t allowed to take fruit off of Maui (I promise we aren’t as stupid tourist as we sound), so we stood outside airport security in Maui, and ate about 15 each in the space of 5 minutes, before leaving the rest of the giant bag with the dude working the scanner (he was stoked). I’ve never had a stomach ache more worth it.

Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts - it was my first time making them, but definitely won’t be my last. The process is a little different to making brioche doughnuts, in that the dough is much sweeter and softer than brioche, which results in the softest, most pillowy doughnuts. It uses evaporated milk, which only adds to the amazing flavour. I’m totally obsessed with the texture. Alana’s recipe includes a pastry cream filling, spiked with Liliko’i juice, which is tart and flavourful, and goes perfectly with the sugar rolled doughnuts. These would be perfect for a party, or for feeding a crowd, or for whenever you feel the need to make some incredible doughnuts.

A few wee tips:

  • I made both the dough for the Malasadas and the pastry cream the night before, giving the dough an overnight rest for it’s first rise in the fridge, and giving the pastry cream time to chill completely. Splitting up the process like this makes it super manageable.

  • The dough for the Malasadas is much wetter and softer than standard brioche dough - don’t freak out (I did, a classic me move)! Just keep kneading in the mixer - it will smooth out and become beautiful and super stretchy. You’re looking for it to pull away from the sides.

  • This recipe makes 20-24 doughnuts, which is lots if there aren’t too many of you. I am sure that it can be easily halved!

  • If you’re in NZ, Bread flour is the same as high grade :)

 

 

Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling

- Makes 20-24 -

Reprinted with permission from Aloha Kitchen

Malasada Dough
3/4 cup (180g) Whole milk, warmed to 110°f / 45°c
3/4 cup (180g) Evaporated milk, warmed to 110°f / 45°c
3 Tbsp (45g) Unsalted butter, melted
Two 0.25 packages active dry yeast (4 1/2 tsp total)
1 Tsp Sugar, plus 3/4 cup (150g) and more for dusting
3 large eggs
4 cups (600g) bread flour
3/4 tsp kosher salt
Neutral Oil, for frying

Liliko’i Pastry Cream
3/4 cup (150g) Sugar
2 cups (480g) Whole Milk
6 large egg yolks, lightly beaten
1/4 cup (31g) Cornstarch
Pinch of Kosher salt
1 Tbsp unsalted butter
1 Tsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup (120g) Liliko’i (passionfruit) Juice

 

- PROCESS -

MALASADA DOUGH

In a bowl, combine both milks, the butter, yeast, and 1 tsp sugar and whisk together. Let the mixture sit until the yeast is activated and foamy, about 10 minutes

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the eggs and the remaining 3/4 cup (150g) sugar together on medium speed for 2 to 3 minutes, until light and fluffy. Turn the speed to low and incorporate the flour and the milk mixture in four additions, alternating between wet and dry ingredients. Add the salt and switch to the dough hook. Gradually turn the speed up to medium-high and knead the dough until it’s smooth and pulls away from the sides of the bowl, 5 to 10 minutes. Turn the dough out onto a clean work surface and quickly grease the mixer bowl with butter. Transfer the dough back to the bowl, loosely cover with plastic wrap or a clean kitchen towel, and set in a warm place until doubled in size, 1 to 2 hours.

Lightly grease a large piece of parchment (I used two parchment lined baking sheets) and set aside. On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough 1/2” thick. Using a 3 inch biscuit cutter or 3 inch glass bowl, cut out as many rounds as you can, gathering and reusing the scraps. You should be able to make 20 to 24 rounds. Place them on the greased parchment paper, spacing them 3 inches apart. Cover the rounds with a clean kitchen towel and let them rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Fill a shallow bowl with some sugar and set aside. Fill a wide Dutch Oven or other pot with 2 inches of oil. Heat the pot over medium heat until the oil registers 350°f / 180°c. Alternatively, a deep fryer can be used. Using scissors, cut the greased parchment paper so that each malasada is on its own square. Working in batches, place the malasadas in the oil, paper side up, using tongs to peel off and discard the paper. Cook, flipping once, until puffed and golden, 2 to 3 minutes on each side. Transfer to a wire rack set on a baking sheet; let cool for 5 minutes, then toss with the sugar.

 

PASTRY CREAM

In a saucepan, combine 1/4 cup (50g) of the sugar and the milk and heat over medium heat for 2 to 3 minutes, until it begins to steam. Immediately remove the pan from the heat. Meanwhile, in a mixing bowl, whisk the remaining 1/2 cup (150g) sugar, egg yolks, cornstarch, and salt together until smooth. Slowly ladle about 1/4 cup of the hot milk mixture into the egg yolks, whisking the entire time. Pour the tempered yolk mixture back into the saucepan and cook, whisking continuously, until thick, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove the saucepan from the heat and whisk in the butter, vanilla, and liliko’i juice; continue to whisk until smooth. Pour into a medium glass bowl and cover with plastic wrap directly touching the surface of the pastry cream. Set in a large bowl filled with ice water to cool. Alternatively, place in an airtight container with a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface, and chill overnight.

ASSEMBLY

Using a paring knife, cut a slit on one side into the middle of the malasadas. Fill a pastry bag fitted with a medium round tip halfway full with pastry cream. Pipe about 2 Tbsp of the filling into the slit in the malasada. Refill the pastry bag when it runs low.

Serve immediately, as malasadas are best fresh. Any leftovers can be stored in the fridge in a ziplock bag for up to 24 hours.

Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling from Alana Kysar's new book, Aloha Kitchen. Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts, which are soft and fluffy. They are fried off, then rolled in sugar, then filled with a silky liliko'i pastry cream. These are the perfect indulgent treat, and are super easy to make. #malasadas #doughnuts #lilikoi #passionfruit

Aloha Kitchen is Copyright Alana Kysar 2019, and was Published in 2019 by Ten Speed Press.