Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling


 
Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling from Alana Kysar's new book, Aloha Kitchen. Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts, which are soft and fluffy. They are fried off, then rolled in sugar, then filled with a silky liliko'i pastry cream. These are the perfect indulgent treat, and are super easy to make. #malasadas #doughnuts #lilikoi #passionfruit
Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling from Alana Kysar's new book, Aloha Kitchen. Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts, which are soft and fluffy. They are fried off, then rolled in sugar, then filled with a silky liliko'i pastry cream. These are the perfect indulgent treat, and are super easy to make. #malasadas #doughnuts #lilikoi #passionfruit
Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling from Alana Kysar's new book, Aloha Kitchen. Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts, which are soft and fluffy. They are fried off, then rolled in sugar, then filled with a silky liliko'i pastry cream. These are the perfect indulgent treat, and are super easy to make. #malasadas #doughnuts #lilikoi #passionfruit
Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling from Alana Kysar's new book, Aloha Kitchen. Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts, which are soft and fluffy. They are fried off, then rolled in sugar, then filled with a silky liliko'i pastry cream. These are the perfect indulgent treat, and are super easy to make. #malasadas #doughnuts #lilikoi #passionfruit
Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling from Alana Kysar's new book, Aloha Kitchen. Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts, which are soft and fluffy. They are fried off, then rolled in sugar, then filled with a silky liliko'i pastry cream. These are the perfect indulgent treat, and are super easy to make. #malasadas #doughnuts #lilikoi #passionfruit

Hi hi! My sweet friend Alana wrote a cookbook, and I am so, so excited to be sharing a recipe from it today! Although Alana and I have never actually met IRL (story of my life, this is what happens when you’re a hermit and lots of your friends don’t live in NYC), but we have been internet friends for a few years now, and I was so stoked to get a copy of her new beautiful book, Aloha Kitchen, in the mail recently!

Alana is originally from Hawai’i, and her book not only gives you an incredible history of Hawai’i, the food, and all the cultures that have made it their home, but it is filled with the most beautiful food and recipes. Most people don’t realise just how diverse the food in Hawai’i really is, and this is reflected so, so perfectly in the book. I can’t wait to explore it a little more - the book is already filled with post it notes. Congrats lady, the book is so incredible! x

I thought I was going to have a tough time choosing a recipe to share from the book, but as soon as I came across this recipe for Malasadas with Liliko’i Pastry Cream, my decision was made incredibly easily. I think we all know by now my obsession for a) doughnuts and b) passionfruit / liliko’i, and this ticks both boxes. Passionfruit is super hard to come by in NYC, so when we went to Hawai’i with family a few years ago, it took us a few days to realise that Liliko’i were passionfruit - they are round and yellow in Hawai’i, whereas they are weird purple shrivelled things in NZ, so we didn’t put two and two together! When we did realise, we went on a mad mission to buy a bunch from the local farmer’s market to bring back to NYC, stupidly not realising we weren’t allowed to take fruit off of Maui (I promise we aren’t as stupid tourist as we sound), so we stood outside airport security in Maui, and ate about 15 each in the space of 5 minutes, before leaving the rest of the giant bag with the dude working the scanner (he was stoked). I’ve never had a stomach ache more worth it.

Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts - it was my first time making them, but definitely won’t be my last. The process is a little different to making brioche doughnuts, in that the dough is much sweeter and softer than brioche, which results in the softest, most pillowy doughnuts. It uses evaporated milk, which only adds to the amazing flavour. I’m totally obsessed with the texture. Alana’s recipe includes a pastry cream filling, spiked with Liliko’i juice, which is tart and flavourful, and goes perfectly with the sugar rolled doughnuts. These would be perfect for a party, or for feeding a crowd, or for whenever you feel the need to make some incredible doughnuts.

A few wee tips:

  • I made both the dough for the Malasadas and the pastry cream the night before, giving the dough an overnight rest for it’s first rise in the fridge, and giving the pastry cream time to chill completely. Splitting up the process like this makes it super manageable.

  • The dough for the Malasadas is much wetter and softer than standard brioche dough - don’t freak out (I did, a classic me move)! Just keep kneading in the mixer - it will smooth out and become beautiful and super stretchy. You’re looking for it to pull away from the sides.

  • This recipe makes 20-24 doughnuts, which is lots if there aren’t too many of you. I am sure that it can be easily halved!

  • If you’re in NZ, Bread flour is the same as high grade :)

 

 

Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling

- Makes 20-24 -

Reprinted with permission from Aloha Kitchen

Malasada Dough
3/4 cup (180g) Whole milk, warmed to 110°f / 45°c
3/4 cup (180g) Evaporated milk, warmed to 110°f / 45°c
3 Tbsp (45g) Unsalted butter, melted
Two 0.25 packages active dry yeast (4 1/2 tsp total)
1 Tsp Sugar, plus 3/4 cup (150g) and more for dusting
3 large eggs
4 cups (600g) bread flour
3/4 tsp kosher salt
Neutral Oil, for frying

Liliko’i Pastry Cream
3/4 cup (150g) Sugar
2 cups (480g) Whole Milk
6 large egg yolks, lightly beaten
1/4 cup (31g) Cornstarch
Pinch of Kosher salt
1 Tbsp unsalted butter
1 Tsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup (120g) Liliko’i (passionfruit) Juice

 

- PROCESS -

MALASADA DOUGH

In a bowl, combine both milks, the butter, yeast, and 1 tsp sugar and whisk together. Let the mixture sit until the yeast is activated and foamy, about 10 minutes

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the eggs and the remaining 3/4 cup (150g) sugar together on medium speed for 2 to 3 minutes, until light and fluffy. Turn the speed to low and incorporate the flour and the milk mixture in four additions, alternating between wet and dry ingredients. Add the salt and switch to the dough hook. Gradually turn the speed up to medium-high and knead the dough until it’s smooth and pulls away from the sides of the bowl, 5 to 10 minutes. Turn the dough out onto a clean work surface and quickly grease the mixer bowl with butter. Transfer the dough back to the bowl, loosely cover with plastic wrap or a clean kitchen towel, and set in a warm place until doubled in size, 1 to 2 hours.

Lightly grease a large piece of parchment (I used two parchment lined baking sheets) and set aside. On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough 1/2” thick. Using a 3 inch biscuit cutter or 3 inch glass bowl, cut out as many rounds as you can, gathering and reusing the scraps. You should be able to make 20 to 24 rounds. Place them on the greased parchment paper, spacing them 3 inches apart. Cover the rounds with a clean kitchen towel and let them rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Fill a shallow bowl with some sugar and set aside. Fill a wide Dutch Oven or other pot with 2 inches of oil. Heat the pot over medium heat until the oil registers 350°f / 180°c. Alternatively, a deep fryer can be used. Using scissors, cut the greased parchment paper so that each malasada is on its own square. Working in batches, place the malasadas in the oil, paper side up, using tongs to peel off and discard the paper. Cook, flipping once, until puffed and golden, 2 to 3 minutes on each side. Transfer to a wire rack set on a baking sheet; let cool for 5 minutes, then toss with the sugar.

 

PASTRY CREAM

In a saucepan, combine 1/4 cup (50g) of the sugar and the milk and heat over medium heat for 2 to 3 minutes, until it begins to steam. Immediately remove the pan from the heat. Meanwhile, in a mixing bowl, whisk the remaining 1/2 cup (150g) sugar, egg yolks, cornstarch, and salt together until smooth. Slowly ladle about 1/4 cup of the hot milk mixture into the egg yolks, whisking the entire time. Pour the tempered yolk mixture back into the saucepan and cook, whisking continuously, until thick, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove the saucepan from the heat and whisk in the butter, vanilla, and liliko’i juice; continue to whisk until smooth. Pour into a medium glass bowl and cover with plastic wrap directly touching the surface of the pastry cream. Set in a large bowl filled with ice water to cool. Alternatively, place in an airtight container with a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface, and chill overnight.

ASSEMBLY

Using a paring knife, cut a slit on one side into the middle of the malasadas. Fill a pastry bag fitted with a medium round tip halfway full with pastry cream. Pipe about 2 Tbsp of the filling into the slit in the malasada. Refill the pastry bag when it runs low.

Serve immediately, as malasadas are best fresh. Any leftovers can be stored in the fridge in a ziplock bag for up to 24 hours.

Malasadas with Liliko'i (Passionfruit) Pastry Cream Filling from Alana Kysar's new book, Aloha Kitchen. Malasadas are Portuguese style doughnuts, which are soft and fluffy. They are fried off, then rolled in sugar, then filled with a silky liliko'i pastry cream. These are the perfect indulgent treat, and are super easy to make. #malasadas #doughnuts #lilikoi #passionfruit

Aloha Kitchen is Copyright Alana Kysar 2019, and was Published in 2019 by Ten Speed Press.

Brioche Doughnuts with Tahini Chocolate Pastry Cream and Halva


 
Brioche doughnuts filled with chocolate tahini pastry cream and topped with Halva
Brioche doughnuts filled with chocolate tahini pastry cream and topped with Halva
Brioche doughnuts filled with chocolate tahini pastry cream and topped with Halva
Brioche doughnuts filled with chocolate tahini pastry cream and topped with Halva
Brioche doughnuts filled with chocolate tahini pastry cream and topped with Halva
Brioche doughnuts filled with chocolate tahini pastry cream and topped with Halva

Hoooooly crap. The last few days / weeks / months have been ridic. I feel like I can only every now and then manage to get my head above water to take a big breath. We have been working on some SUPER exciting things at the studio which I can't wait to share with you very soon! I spent the last few days running around town with the team from Bake from scratch and the lovely Edd aka The boy who bakes. They were on a promo tour for the latest issue of the magazine, which is all about British cooking! Seeing as they didn't have a kitchen, I did all the food for the shoots - lots of scones, two 'chocolate biscuit cakes' which were very stressful but thankfully turned out pretty on the inside, and an amazingly delicious chocolate passionfruit bundt cake. I always have the best, best time when they are in town. 

I made these wee guys a week or so ago. I had breakfast with my lovely friend Rachel of Seed and Mill, and she sent me home with some of their amazing products - the best tahini ever, and a wee package of Halva! If you haven't had halva before, you should try some ASAP - it's made by adding tahini to a sugar syrup and then mixing until it crystalizes. Different flavours are then added. If you are ever in NYC make sure you stop by Seed and Mill at Chelsea Market - their soft serve is one of my fave things ever. 

I have been meaning to incorporate tahini into a dessert / baked good ever since these cookies, and so here you go! I took my fave brioche recipe, and turned it into doughnuts, then loaded them up with a pastry cream that I gussied up with some dark chocolate and tahini. Tahini and chocolate are great friends - the chocolate really plays on the nuttiness of the tahini, and stirred into a pastry cream is always going to be a good time. I rolled the freshly fried doughnuts in a cocoa sugar mix which tastes like that shitty chocolate icing your mum made as a kid, before filling them with the pastry cream and topping with a chunk of halva. If you're going to do decadent, you might as well do it properly. 

A few wee tips:

  • If you can, make the pastry cream the night before or a few hours before you start, so that it has time to cool in the fridge. If not, and you're in a time pinch, no worries - just line a shallow baking sheet (I usually use a quarter sheet) with plastic wrap, spread the cream in, then put another piece of plastic wrap on top, and leave it to cool in the fridge, giving it 5 minute blasts in the freezer occasionally if needed. More surface area = quicker cooling time!
  • If you can't find Halva, you can definitely leave it out! I just used it as a wee topping. 
  • The first rise for these can be done overnight in the fridge - they may just need a little more time on their second rise once you have shaped them. 
 

 

Brioche Doughnuts with Tahini Chocolate Pastry Cream and Halva

- Makes about 12 -

Pastry Cream adapted from The Cook and Baker

Tahini Chocolate Pastry Cream
650g Whole milk
1 Tbsp vanilla bean paste, or the scrapings of one vanilla bean
1/4 tsp salt
70g corn starch
110g granulated sugar
2 eggs plus one yolk
60g unsalted butter, at room temp, cut into cubes
80g dark chocolate, finely chopped
150g tahini

Brioche Doughnuts
1 envelope (2 1/4 tsp) active dry yeast
1 cup (240ml) whole milk, lukewarm
4 Tbsp sugar
3 3/4 cups (565g) all-purpose flour
1 tsp salt
2 eggs, at room temperature
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
90g (6 tbsp) unsalted butter, at room temperature
100g Sugar plus 1 Tbsp cocoa, for rolling
Neutral oil, for frying

About 150g halva, for finishing (optional)

 

 

- PROCESS -

 

TAHINI PASTRY CREAM 

In a large heavy bottomed saucepan, combine the milk, vanilla bean paste and salt. Heat over medium low until bubbles begin to form around the outside of the milk, and it is just shy of a simmer. 

While the milk is heating, whisk together the corn starch and sugar in a medium bowl. Add the eggs and yolk, and whisk well until pale. 

Once the milk has heated, remove from the heat and pour half into the egg and sugar mixture, whisking constantly. Mix until well combined. Transfer back into the milk saucepan, and place over a low to medium heat. Cook, whisking constantly, until the pastry cream is very thick, approximately 8-10 minutes. 

Set up a sieve over a clean bowl. Once the pastry cream is thick, pass through the sieve into the bowl. Stir in the butter and chocolate, and mix until well incorporated. Add the tahini, and mix to combine. Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface of the pastry cream, and refrigerate until completely chilled. If you need to speed this process up, line a sheet pan or shallow tray with plastic wrap and spread the pastry cream over it to speed up the chilling process.

 

BRIOCHE DOUGHNUTS

In a small bowl, combine the yeast, milk and 2 Tbsp of the sugar. Mix well, and leave to sit for 10-15 minutes, or until foamy.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine the flour, salt, and remaining 2 Tbsp sugar. Mix briefly to combine. Add the eggs, vanilla, and foamy yeast mixture to the bowl. Mix on low for 2-3 minutes, until the dough is starting to come together. It may look slightly dry but do not worry - it will mix together nicely in the next steps. Increase the mixer speed to medium, and mix for another 10 minutes, until the dough is soft and smooth.

Reduce the mixer speed to low, and add the butter a little at a time, waiting until it is fully incorporated into the dough before adding the next piece. This process should take 3-4 minutes. Once the butter is fully incorporated, increase the mixer speed to medium, and mix for a further 5 minutes, until the dough is very soft and smooth.

Transfer to an oiled bowl, and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Place in a warm spot until doubled in size, approximately 1 - 1 1/2 hours.

Turn the dough out onto a well floured surface. Weigh, and divide into 12 equal weight portions. Roll each portion into a tight ball. Place the rolled doughnuts on a baking tray lined with parchment paper.

Leave the doughnuts to proof for a further 20 minutes. When you poke them lightly with your finger, it should leave a small indentation that springs back.

While the doughnuts are proofing, heat the oil in a large heavy-bottomed pot (cast iron works great). Heat the oil to 165˚c / 330˚f. Combine the sugar and cocoa powder, and place in a shallow bowl for tossing the doughnuts.

Once the oil has come to temperature, test it with a few scraps of dough. Gently lower the doughnuts, two at a time, into the hot oil. Cook for 2 1/2 to 3 minutes on each side until golden brown. Remove from the oil using a slotted spoon and place on a cooling rack. Allow to cool for 30 seconds before tossing in the sugar. Repeat the process with the rest of the doughnuts. Once the doughnuts are cool, poke a hole in them using a chopstick, and widen the hole using your finger.

ASSEMBLY

Transfer the pastry cream to a piping bag fitted with a round piping tip. Fill each doughnut with pastry cream - you will feel it become heavier in your hand. Pipe a little blob on top of each doughnut, and top with a chunk of halva. 

Best, served on the day that they are made.

Brioche doughnuts filled with chocolate tahini pastry cream and topped with Halva

Gingerbread Brioche Doughnuts with Spiced Brown Sugar Diplomat Cream


 
Gingerbread doughnuts with a spiced brown sugar diplomat cream. Pillowy brioche dough, spiced lightly with ginger and molasses, are stuffed with a light and creamy filling which is loaded with christmas spice. A perfect little package of holiday cheer
Gingerbread doughnuts with a spiced brown sugar diplomat cream. Pillowy brioche dough, spiced lightly with ginger and molasses, are stuffed with a light and creamy filling which is loaded with christmas spice. A perfect little package of holiday cheer
Gingerbread doughnuts with a spiced brown sugar diplomat cream. Pillowy brioche dough, spiced lightly with ginger and molasses, are stuffed with a light and creamy filling which is loaded with christmas spice. A perfect little package of holiday cheer
Gingerbread doughnuts with a spiced brown sugar diplomat cream. Pillowy brioche dough, spiced lightly with ginger and molasses, are stuffed with a light and creamy filling which is loaded with christmas spice. A perfect little package of holiday cheer
Gingerbread doughnuts with a spiced brown sugar diplomat cream. Pillowy brioche dough, spiced lightly with ginger and molasses, are stuffed with a light and creamy filling which is loaded with christmas spice. A perfect little package of holiday cheer
Gingerbread doughnuts with a spiced brown sugar diplomat cream. Pillowy brioche dough, spiced lightly with ginger and molasses, are stuffed with a light and creamy filling which is loaded with christmas spice. A perfect little package of holiday cheer
Gingerbread doughnuts with a spiced brown sugar diplomat cream. Pillowy brioche dough, spiced lightly with ginger and molasses, are stuffed with a light and creamy filling which is loaded with christmas spice. A perfect little package of holiday cheer
Gingerbread doughnuts with a spiced brown sugar diplomat cream. Pillowy brioche dough, spiced lightly with ginger and molasses, are stuffed with a light and creamy filling which is loaded with christmas spice. A perfect little package of holiday cheer

I'm finally feeling semi Christmassy. And if semi Christmassy means very stressed and a little Christmassy, then i'm feeling that too. So I took all the very stressed and semi Christmassy I am feeling, and I jammed it all into these doughnuts. It was a great idea if you ask me - doughnuts are the ultimate comfort food in my book. They sound daunting to make but are really very satisfying - I love watching them puff up in the oil as they fry. I happily spent an afternoon ignoring adulting, and whipping these wee guys up, and they turned out far too good to just keep the recipe to myself.

I wanted to have some warming christmas spice in there, to keep it extra holiday-ish, so I adapted my favourite brioche dough (it's amazing in scrolls, burger buns, babka, and now turns out it can be fried!), and added a little ground ginger and molasses. I then filled them with a brown sugar spiced diplomat cream - which is really just a fancy name for pastry cream / custard which has been folded through whipped cream. I spiced the pastry cream with the regular suspects - cinnamon, allspice and a little ginger to help carry the flavour through. Once it was folded in with the whipped cream, it made for a beautiful filling - not too sweet, and lovely and light against the fluffy doughnut. (My friend said that she though that it was 'refreshing' which I though was a nice way of putting it!)

I'm not going to tell you what to do - but I think you should make these for your christmas gathering. The dough can be prepared ahead of time - you can give it its first rise in the fridge overnight, and the filling can be made in advance too. They are the perfect wee twist on a regular filled doughnut - just enough spice to make you think of the holidays, but also a welcome change to all of the cookies and desserts you are likely to encounter. Plus. Doughnuts. 

A few wee tips:

  • A thermometer is going to be your friend here, as it is very important to keep the oil at a specific temperature. Too cold and the doughnuts will soak up oil, too hot and the outsides will cook before the inside does, and you will have a gooey mess. (if you don't have a thermometer and a set of scales, then I suggest you self-gift ASAP this holiday season, both are game changers)

  • Along the same lines of specific oil temperature, cast iron is great to fry in because it maintains heat very well.

  • The Dough can be made the night before you want to make these, and given its first rest in the fridge. Just increase the second rise a little once you have cut them out to allow the dough to warm up.

  • Pastry cream can be made ahead too, but I suggest, if possible, folding through the whipped cream the day you are planning on using it. You may have a little diplomat cream left over, but it is awesome on fruit / desserts / straight out of the piping bag into your mouth.

  • I measure the amount of pastry cream I have, then use 2/3 that amount (multiply the amount of pastry cream by 0.66) of cream, hence the 'approximately' in the method - you will need to do some quick maths to work it out when the time comes.

 

 

Gingerbread Brioche Doughnuts with Spiced Brown Sugar Diplomat Cream

- Makes 14-16 doughnuts -

Spiced Brown Sugar Diplomat Cream
100g egg yolks (about 8 yolks)
105g light brown sugar
30g corn starch
415g whole milk
1 Tbsp vanilla paste, or the scrapings from one vanilla bean
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 tsp ginger
20g unsalted butter, at room temperature
Approximately 300g heavy cream

Bread Dough
1 envelope (2 1/4 tsp) active dry yeast
1 cup (240ml) whole milk, lukewarm
3 Tbsp brown sugar, divided
3 3/4 cups (565g) all-purpose flour
1 tsp salt
2 Tbsp ground ginger
1 tsp cinnamon
2 eggs, at room temperature
2 Tbsp unsulphered molasses  
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
90g (6 tbsp) unsalted butter, at room temperature

Neutral Oil, for frying (about 4-6 cups)
Granulated sugar for tossing doughnuts

 

- PROCESS -

DIPLOMAT CREAM

 

In a large bowl, whisk together the yolks, sugar and cornflour.

In a medium pot, warm the milk, vanilla paste and spices until there is movement just around the edges of the milk - do not bring it to the boil. 

Remove the milk from the heat, and, whisking constantly, add half of the milk mixture into the egg and cornflour mixture to temper the egg yolks. Whisk briskly for 30 seconds. Transfer the milk-yolk mixture back to the pot, and return to a medium heat. Whisk constantly until very thick. 

Remove from the heat and whisk in the butter, mixing well until totally combined. Allow to stand for 5-10 minutes, whisking occasionally. 

Strain the pastry cream through a mesh sieve, and into a bowl. Cool to room temperature then place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the pastry cream to prevent a skin. Place in the fridge until completely cooled.

When you are ready to fill the doughnuts, weigh the amount of pastry cream that you have - it should be around 450g (see notes). Whip 300g cream until stiff peaks form. Gently fold through the pastry cream until well combined. Store in the fridge if not using immediately.

BRIOCHE DOUGHNUTS

In a small bowl, combine the yeast, milk and 1 Tbsp of the brown sugar. Mix well, and leave to sit for 10-15 minutes, or until foamy.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine the flour, salt, ginger, cinnamon, and remaining 2 Tbsp brown sugar. Mix briefly to combine. Add the eggs, molasses, vanilla, and foamy yeast mixture to the bowl. Mix on low for 2-3 minutes, until the dough is starting to come together. It may look slightly dry but do not worry - it will mix together nicely in the next steps. Increase the mixer speed to medium, and mix for another 10 minutes, until the dough is soft and smooth. 

Reduce the mixer speed to low, and add the butter a little at a time, waiting until it is fully incorporated into the dough before adding the next piece. This process should take 3-4 minutes. Once the butter is fully incorporated, increase the mixer speed to medium, and mix for a further 5 minutes, until the dough is very soft and smooth. 

Transfer to an oiled bowl, and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Place in a warm spot until doubled in size, approximately 1 - 1 1/2 hours. 

Turn the dough out onto a well floured surface. Roll into a circle that is about 2cm thick (3/4 inch). Leave to sit for 5 minutes to allow the dough to relax.

Cut out circle shapes using a cookie cutter approximately 2.5 inches (6cm) in diameter. Place the cut doughnuts on a baking tray lined with parchment paper.

Leave the doughnuts to proof for a further 20 minutes. When you poke them lightly with your finger, it should leave a small indentation that springs back. 

While the doughnuts are proofing, heat the oil in a large heavy-bottomed pot (cast iron works great). Heat the oil to 175-180˚c / 340-350˚f. Fill a shallow bowl with sugar for tossing the doughnuts.

Once the oil has come to temperature, test it with a few scraps of dough. Gently lower the doughnuts, two at a time, into the hot oil. Cook for 1 1/2 - 2 minutes on each side until golden brown. Remove from the oil using a slotted spoon and place on a cooling rack. Allow to cool for 30 seconds before tossing in the sugar. Repeat the process with the rest of the doughnuts. Once the doughnuts are cool, poke a hole in them using a chopstick, and widen the hole using your finger.

ASSEMBLY

Fill a piping bag fitted with a medium-sized round tip with the diplomat cream. Carefully fill the cavity of the doughnut with the diplomat cream as full as the doughnut will allow you - you can usually feel when they are full as they suddenly feel heavier. When you pull away the piping bag, a little of the pastry cream should ooze out. 

Serve immediately. Leftover doughnuts can be kept in an airtight container in the fridge - bring to room temperature before serving, and sprinkle with a little fresh granulated sugar.

Gingerbread doughnuts with a spiced brown sugar diplomat cream. Pillowy brioche dough, spiced lightly with ginger and molasses, are stuffed with a light and creamy filling which is loaded with christmas spice. A perfect little package of holiday cheer