Roasted Peach Streusel Macarons


 
Roasted Peach Streusel Macarons - inspired by the peach cobbler, these french macarons have a roasted peach german buttercream, and a brown butter streusel crunch #macarons #peachcobbler #frenchmacaron #roastedpeach #germanbuttercream
Roasted Peach Streusel Macarons - inspired by the peach cobbler, these french macarons have a roasted peach german buttercream, and a brown butter streusel crunch #macarons #peachcobbler #frenchmacaron #roastedpeach #germanbuttercream
Roasted Peach Streusel Macarons - inspired by the peach cobbler, these french macarons have a roasted peach german buttercream, and a brown butter streusel crunch #macarons #peachcobbler #frenchmacaron #roastedpeach #germanbuttercream
Roasted Peach Streusel Macarons - inspired by the peach cobbler, these french macarons have a roasted peach german buttercream, and a brown butter streusel crunch #macarons #peachcobbler #frenchmacaron #roastedpeach #germanbuttercream
Roasted Peach Streusel Macarons - inspired by the peach cobbler, these french macarons have a roasted peach german buttercream, and a brown butter streusel crunch #macarons #peachcobbler #frenchmacaron #roastedpeach #germanbuttercream
Roasted Peach Streusel Macarons - inspired by the peach cobbler, these french macarons have a roasted peach german buttercream, and a brown butter streusel crunch #macarons #peachcobbler #frenchmacaron #roastedpeach #germanbuttercream
Roasted Peach Streusel Macarons - inspired by the peach cobbler, these french macarons have a roasted peach german buttercream, and a brown butter streusel crunch #macarons #peachcobbler #frenchmacaron #roastedpeach #germanbuttercream

Back here with another peach recipe! They really are so good at the moment that it would be a shame not to make the most of them. Also back here with another Macaron recipe - once again, on the last day of the month. Whoops. But also - Roasted Peach Streusel Macarons. These Peach cobbler inspired treats are the perfect wee summer treat! 

Jase and I wanted to really jam a strong peach flavour into these wee babes, so we went with my fave - a vanilla bean german buttercream, which we then added a whole load of roasted peaches to. The key to adding fruit to a buttercream and avoiding the separation due to the liquid is removing as much of that liquid as you can first. You can do this by using freeze dried fruit, or cooking the fruit down into a puree or compote. We roasted the peaches with a little vanilla bean, sugar, and a pinch of salt, until they were delicious and soft, and then added that to the buttercream. I love roasted peaches as is, but added to a buttery, custardy german buttercream - the best. 

We wanted to go for a bit of a peach cobbler vibe, so toped the shells of the macs with a brown butter streusel. The toasty streusel paired perfectly with the chewy shell and the fruity buttercream, to create the most delicious little bite! I do hope you give these a try - they are so, so good! I can't wait to add the streusel / roasted peach german buttercream to a whole lot of things this summer!

As we have been making these each month, we have ironed out more and more of the kinks associated with macaron making. Something that we had been struggling with was that our macarons were coming out oval shaped, and we couldn't seem to work out why. For some reason it was only an issue when we made them at Jase's, and it had seemed to be getting worse. Suddenly we realised that as the year had gone on and the weather had gotten hotter, Jase's air con had been on and on more and more! I don't tend to have it on when I am baking at mine - and had never struggled with oval macarons at my house before, so it suddenly all made sense! We switched off the aircon, made another batch (for science), and sure enough, they turned out nice and round! This makes total sense as it was only happening in one place! So, if you have an aircon / heater / some sort of breeze in your kitchen, try to minimise, just while the macs are resting! 

A few wee tips:

  • Everything I can think of that will make macaron making easier has been added to this post - I update it as I go!
  • The ideal order for making these is: Make the pastry cream, roasted peaches and streusel the night before, then make the mac shells and mix up the buttercream the day of! Everything can definitely be done the day of, but it is a couple of different components so may take some time. If you do it day of, make pastry cream first, then prep the streusel while the peaches are roasting, and then get that on once the peaches are done. Then make your mac shells, and whip up the buttercream while they are baking!
  • I was originally grinding the almond meal and powdered sugar together, but then realised it really only needed sifting, I just had the wrong sized sieve! You want one with a medium sized mesh (I ordered this one), and make sure you sift twice to remove any big lumps and aerate the mixture. 
  • We also discovered an amazing parchment - and haven't had a single mac stick since we started using it. It's a non-stick parchment paper - we used this one. 
  • The pastry cream for the buttercream ideally needs overnight so ensure you plan for this, otherwise you can cool it quicker in an ice bath, or by spreading it in a quarter baking sheet lined with plastic, covering the surface of the pastry cream with another piece of plastic wrap, and chilling it in the freezer until cool. The larger surface area and shallow baking sheet mean that it cools much faster. 
  • Adjust the sugar depending on the sweetness / juiciness of your peaches!
  • Because you start with cool pastry cream (as opposed to slightly warm meringue as you would for a SMBC), make sure that your butter is very room temperature. If it isn't quite soft enough and you find your buttercream is seizing, you can remove about 1/3 cup of the buttercream, melt in the microwave, and then add back in and continue whipping. The heat from the melted buttercream is often enough to bring it all back together into the silky niceness you are after. 
  • You will have some streusel leftover - store in an airtight container. It's amazing on ice cream!
  • If you need a template, print two of these and stick them together to use as a guide.
 

 

Roasted Peach Streusel Macarons 

- Makes about 24 sandwiched macarons -

Macaron Shell Recipe from I love Macarons, with adaptations from Fox and Crane 

Roasted Peach German Buttercream
190g whole milk
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
110g sugar
12g (1 1/2 Tbsp) corn starch
1 egg
1 egg yolk
Pinch of salt
340 (3 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature
300g roasted peach puree (recipe follows)

Roasted Peach Puree
600g fresh, ripe peaches, cut into segments (I leave mine unpeeled and peel once cooked)
70g raw sugar
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
Pinch Salt

Brown Butter Streusel
80g unsalted butter, cubed
100g Dark Brown Sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
115g all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp allspice

Macaron Shells
170g ground almonds
300g powdered sugar
180g egg whites, at room temperature
160g sugar
about 10 drops of peach gel food colouring (we used peach by americolor)
1 tsp vanilla bean paste

 

- PROCESS -

ROASTED PEACH GERMAN BUTTERCREAM

In a bowl, whisk together the sugar, corn starch, egg, egg yolk and salt. In a medium non-stick saucepan, heat the milk and vanilla to just shy of a simmer.  Remove from the heat.

Using one hand to whisk constantly, pour half of the hot milk mixture into the egg mixture. This helps to temper the eggs and stop them from scrambling. Whisk until incorporated, and then pour the whole lot back into the saucepan. 

Heat the milk and egg mixture over medium heat, whisking constantly, until it begins to bubble. It will thicken quickly. Once it has thickened, cook for one minute, then remove from the heat. Pour into a shallow dish or bowl of a stand mixer and press some plastic wrap over the surface to avoid a skin from forming. Refrigerate until cold - at least four hours, preferably overnight.

Fit your mixer with the whisk attachment.  Whip the mixture on medium until creamy and lump-free. Begin adding the butter, a few cubes at a time, until fully incorporated. It may look curdled at some point but just keep whipping - it will come together! Once the buttercream is homogenous, add the peach puree and mix well to combine. Store in an airtight container until ready to use, or if using immediately, transfer to a piping bag.

ROASTED PEACH PUREE

Preheat the oven to 425˚f / 220˚c. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper. In a medium bowl, combine the peach segments, sugar, vanilla bean paste and salt, and toss to combine. Spread evenly over the baking sheet, and bake for 30 minutes, until the peaches are soft and beginning to caramelise. Allow to cool on the pan before removing the skins from the segments, and placing the segments in a bowl. Roughly mash with a fork. Set aside until you are making the buttercream - you will use 300g of the puree. 

BROWN BUTTER STREUSEL

Preheat the oven to 350˚f / 180˚c. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. 

To make the streusel, place the butter in a small pan, and place on the stove over medium heat. Heat, stirring occasionally, until the butter has melted. Continue to cook, until the butter begins to foam, smells nutty, and goes a deep golden brown colour. Remove from the heat and place in a medium heatproof bowl. Add the remaining ingredients, and mix well to combine. Using your hands, break up any large lumps. Spread evenly over the baking sheet, and bake until lightly golden and toasty, 10-15 minutes. Remove and allow to cool completely before storing in an airtight container.

MACARON SHELLS

Preheat oven to 300˚f / 150˚c, and position the oven rack in the centre of the oven. Using a round cookie cutter or the base of a large piping tip (something about 1.5 inches in diameter), draw a "template" for your macarons on a piece of parchment paper, leaving about 3/4" between each circle. 

Combine the almond meal and powdered sugar together in a large bowl. Sift the mixture twice, to ensure there are no large lumps and that the mixture is properly aerated. Set aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the egg whites on medium speed until foamy. Gradually add the sugar, increase the mixer speed, and whip on high until the meringue starts to firm up. Add peach gel food colour a few drops at a time, until the desired colour is reached. Add vanilla and mix until incorporated. Continue to whip until the meringue forms stiff peaks (there is a good example here). 

Remove the bowl from the mixer. Add half of the ground almond and powdered sugar mixture, and fold into the meringue. You want to deflate the meringue just a little at this stage, to combine the meringue and ground almond mixture. 

Add the remaining ground almond mixture, and stir lightly to combine. Now comes the important part - mixing the batter to the correct consistency. Again, this video does a good job of explaining it. Fold the mixture in a series of 'turns', deflating the batter by spreading it against the side of the bowl. Turn the bowl slightly and repeat the movement - scooping the batter from the bottom of the bowl, and spreading it against the side. Continuously check the consistency of the batter - you want it to flow like lava when you lift the spatula from the bowl, and you should be able to 'draw' a figure 8 with it, without the batter breaking (again, watch lots of videos to get an idea! They help so much). This step can take some practice until you know what it should feel and look like. If in doubt you are better to under mix them than over mix them - the process of putting the batter into the bag and piping out will help mix a little too.

Fit a large pastry bag with a medium sized round tip, such as an ateco #805. Place the macaron template on a sheet pan, and place a second piece of parchment over it. Holding the piping bag at a 90˚ angle to the surface, pipe out the batter into blobs the size of the circles drawn on the template. Finish off each piped circle with a little "flick" of your wrist to minimise the batter forming a point (it will still form a small one, but we can get rid of this with banging). Remove the template from under the macarons.

Hold the baking sheet in two hands, and carefully but firmly, evenly bang it against the bench. Repeat this a few more times - this will get rid of any air bubbles, remove points on the top, and help them to spread out slightly.  Sprinkle half of the macaron shells on the baking sheet with streusel.

Repeat the piping and banging process until you have used up all of the batter - I usually make three sheet pans worth. 

Allow the macarons to dry at room temperature for approximately 30 minutes, or until they form a skin that you can touch without your finger sticking to them. This time will drastically vary depending on the humidity. 

About fifteen minutes before you are going to bake the macarons, place a spare sheet pan in the oven to preheat - this is going to be used to place under the pan with the macarons on it, to double up, which should help with even baking. Bake the macarons one sheet at a time - place the sheet with the macarons on the preheated sheet, and place in the oven. 

Bake for approximately 18 minutes, rotating the pan once during the cooking process, and checking for doneness after 15 minutes. The macarons should develop a foot (the ruffled part on the bottom of the macaron), and bake without browning. To see if they are done - press down lightly on a shell. If the foot gives way, it needs a little longer, if it is stable, then it is close to being done. Test a macaron shell - if you can peel it away cleanly from the paper, they are done. If they are stable but cannot yet peel away cleanly, give them another minute or so. Again, this part takes a little trial and error depending on your oven. If they seem done but do not peel away cleanly, do not worry - there is a little trick for that! 

Remove from the oven, and allow to cool on the sheet pan for 10 minutes before peeling off the parchment paper and allowing to cool completely on a wire rack. Repeat the baking with the remaining trays, using the same spare sheet pan to double up.

If your macs do not peel away cleanly, place them, on the parchment paper, into the freezer for 5-10 minutes, then peel away from the paper. 

Store cooled macarons in an airtight container until ready to use. 

ASSEMBLY

Transfer the buttercream to a piping bag fitted with a round attachment (such as an ateco #805) Match the macaron shells up so that they are in pairs of equal size, with one streusel coated shell and one plain shell per pair.

Pipe a blob of buttercream on one half of the macaron, and place the second half on top, pressing lightly. Macarons are best after an overnight rest in the refrigerator. Bring to room temperature before eating.

Roasted Peach Streusel Macarons - inspired by the peach cobbler, these french macarons have a roasted peach german buttercream, and a brown butter streusel crunch #macarons #peachcobbler #frenchmacaron #roastedpeach #germanbuttercream

Mini peach pies


 
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert
Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert

It's finally, FINALLY bbq season! Not that there will be much of it happening at our house - our building drew us in with an 'awesome outdoor space and amazing communal rooftop' when we were moving in, only to pull the roof off and close the outdoor space within a few months of us moving in, rendering this 'amazing space' essentially just a place to put everyone's crap from the roof. Luckily we have a few friends with nice back yards and bbqs, who are yet to be opposed to us showing up to their house with food. 

BBQ season means stonefruit, and stonefruit means epic pies! Peaches are hands down my favourite things to put into pie. I made a whole load of mini pies to take to a friends birthday bbq on the weekend, and they were a total hit. The fun with mini pies is that you can play around with lattice combinations, so they all end up looking a little different. They are easy to eat, and everyone loves the idea of having their own individual dessert. Next on my list of mini pies is definitely something savoury - meat pies are everywhere in New Zealand. For some reason America hasn't caught on yet, which I am always surprised seeing how terrible they are for you! 

These pies are super simple, but super delicious. I went with my favourite dough recipe, then kept the filling easy - beautiful ripe peaches, just a touch of sugar, some cornflour to help the filling set up, and some vanilla bean paste. Easy as that. The pastry bakes up to be amazingly flaky, providing the perfect base for the peaches to shine through, enhanced by the teeniest bit of sweetness and fragrance of vanilla. Because I over commit to almost everything I do, I spent a fair amount of time coming up with individual lattice designs for each one, but you could easily just do a simple lattice top on all of them, or even just a plain circle lid on each one with a few vents cut in to let out the steam. I went with a mixture of lattices, cut-out tops and shapes cut out with stamps

This recipe is part of a fun blogger collaboration organised by the lovely Annie, Ruth and Rebecca! Check out their pages for the full list of bloggers participating, or the hashtag #summerlovespeaches on Instagram!

A few wee tips:

  • I used these mini pie dishes to make these - they are the perfect size for individual pies. I also made two in little rectangular pans, but you can use whatever size dish you have on hand!

  • I also used one of these to cut my lattice - highly highly recommend. It's super satisfying and you get lovely even strips.

  • I didn't peel my peaches, but if you are the sort of person who doesn't like peach skin, by all means go for it.

  • I lined all of the pie dishes first with pastry, and kept them in the fridge until I was ready to use each one. I filled them individually with the fruit mixture as I went, and did the lattices one at a time so that the others could stay cold in the fridge. This worked quite well, but if you are going with a quick lattice on the top you could definitely fill then lattice them all at once - just transfer them to the fridge as soon as they are done so that the pastry doesn't get too soft.

  • Because I was filling them individually as I went, I made up half of the filling, then once it was used up, made up the second half and kept going. The reason that I did this is because as the filling sits, the fruit releases some of it's moisture, which means that it gets a little juicy in the bowl. If you wanted to cut up all the fruit at once, transfer half to a bowl, squeeze a little lemon over to stop it going brown, and store in the fridge until you are ready to go.

  • I tripled my usual pie dough recipe, making it in 3 batches, and there was a little leftover once I was done. I like to end up with a little bit of dough left rather than not having enough - I roll out the bottom crust, then use the rest of the fresh unrolled dough for lattice, then go back and use the extras for stamps. Just make sure that you put the extra dough in the fridge, tightly wrapped, to have a chance to firm up before you use it again.

  • This recipe is easily scaleable to suit your numbers! If you were wanting to make just a single regular sized pie, use the one batch quantities for the dough, and use approximately 2-3 pounds of fruit.

 

 

Mini peach pies
- Makes 10 mini pies -

Pie crust recipe from four and twenty blackbirds

Pie dough (1 batch)
2 1/2 cups (310g) Flour
Pinch of Salt
2 tsp (8g) sugar
2 sticks (226g) cold butter, cut into cubes
1 cup (240ml) cold water
1 cup ice
1/4 cup (60ml) Apple cider vinegar

Pie dough (3 batches)
7 1/2 cups (930g) Flour
Pinch of Salt
6 tsp (24g) sugar
2 sticks (226g) cold butter, cut into cubes
2 cups (480ml) cold water
2 cups ice
1/2 cup (60ml) Apple cider vinegar

Filling
3kg (approx 6 pounds) peaches, pitted and cut into cubes or slices
3/4 cup (150g) raw sugar
1/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp cornflour
1 Tbsp vanilla bean paste

Egg wash - 1 egg whisked with 1 Tbsp water
Extra raw sugar for sprinkling

- PROCESS -

PIE DOUGH

Make each batch of dough separately. Using one batch quantities: Place flour, sugar and salt into a large bowl. Cut butter into chunks, and add to the flour. Toss lightly to coat. Working quickly, using a pastry blender or  your fingers,  cut the butter into the flour mixture until there are only pea-sized chunks left. You want a few lumps of butter remaining to keep the pastry nice and tender.

Combine ice, water and cider vinegar in a bowl. Sprinkle a few tablespoons of the ice water into the flour and butter mixture, and using a stiff spatula or your hands, mix in well. Continue adding water a tablespoon at a time ( I normally need about 8-10 tbsp) until you have a dough that holds together well, but is not too wet. Squeeze together with your fingertips to make a homogenous dough. Shape into two discs and wrap in plastic wrap.

Repeat the process three times until you have six discs of dough.

Rest in the fridge for at least two hours, or preferably overnight. 

FILLING AND ASSEMBLY

Toss the peaches, sugar, cornflour and vanilla paste together in a large bowl. If you are planning on decorating the pies individually, prepare half the filling, then prepare the second half once you are ready to minimize the amount of moisture the fruit releases.

Roll out 2 of the discs of dough until approximately 1/4 inch in thickness (6mm). Line each mini pie dish with dough, leaving a small amount of overhang. Place the lined pie dishes on a large baking sheet, and transfer to the fridge until ready to use.

Working with one pie at a time, Spoon enough fruit filling into the pie dish to just reach the top edge. Roll out about half a disc of dough to 1/4 inch. Decorate as desired - I did a range of lattices, braids, stamps etc. Either use leftover dough on the next pie, or wrap tightly in plastic wrap and rest in the fridge until ready to use again. Place the pie in the fridge.

Repeat with the remaining pies, returning to the fridge. When you are finished decorating, rest all the pies in the fridge for at least 30 minutes to allow the pastry to fully set.

While the pies are resting, preheat the oven to 425˚f / 220˚c. Position two oven racks in the oven.  Brush each pie with the egg wash, and sprinkle liberally with raw sugar. Place the pies on two baking sheets, and bake for 40-45 minutes, swapping the trays half way through baking, or until the pastry is deeply golden and the fruit is bubbling.

Allow to cool on a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Mini peach pies - individual peach pies, perfect for a picnic, bbq, or summer dessert