Toasted Coconut Ice Cream Pops with Passionfruit Magic Shell


 
Toasted Coconut Ice Cream Pops with Passionfruit magic shell - a creamy toasted coconut ice cream is dipped in a punchy passionfruit magic shell. Quite possibly the most perfect ice cream combination you will ever come across. #passionfruit #toastedcoconut #icecreampop #icecream #magicshell
Toasted Coconut Ice Cream Pops with Passionfruit magic shell - a creamy toasted coconut ice cream is dipped in a punchy passionfruit magic shell. Quite possibly the most perfect ice cream combination you will ever come across. #passionfruit #toastedcoconut #icecreampop #icecream #magicshell
Toasted Coconut Ice Cream Pops with Passionfruit magic shell - a creamy toasted coconut ice cream is dipped in a punchy passionfruit magic shell. Quite possibly the most perfect ice cream combination you will ever come across. #passionfruit #toastedcoconut #icecreampop #icecream #magicshell
Toasted Coconut Ice Cream Pops with Passionfruit magic shell - a creamy toasted coconut ice cream is dipped in a punchy passionfruit magic shell. Quite possibly the most perfect ice cream combination you will ever come across. #passionfruit #toastedcoconut #icecreampop #icecream #magicshell
Toasted Coconut Ice Cream Pops with Passionfruit magic shell - a creamy toasted coconut ice cream is dipped in a punchy passionfruit magic shell. Quite possibly the most perfect ice cream combination you will ever come across. #passionfruit #toastedcoconut #icecreampop #icecream #magicshell
Toasted Coconut Ice Cream Pops with Passionfruit magic shell - a creamy toasted coconut ice cream is dipped in a punchy passionfruit magic shell. Quite possibly the most perfect ice cream combination you will ever come across. #passionfruit #toastedcoconut #icecreampop #icecream #magicshell
Toasted Coconut Ice Cream Pops with Passionfruit magic shell - a creamy toasted coconut ice cream is dipped in a punchy passionfruit magic shell. Quite possibly the most perfect ice cream combination you will ever come across. #passionfruit #toastedcoconut #icecreampop #icecream #magicshell

Friday marked 3 months we haven't had gas to our apartment. And ohhhhh boy I am pissed off about it. Cooking on a wee camping style element is ok, until you have to make two things at once. Or, say, you would like all the components of dinner ready at the same time. A lady in my building told me she's just been eating tacos for three months. While we aren't that extreme, it's definitely annoying. But instead of coming here to complain more (lol, too late), I'm gonna pop this recipe here that still requires the use of a burner, but only one at a time and just for a wee bit - these toasted coconut ice cream pops with a passionfruit magic shell.

A couple of months ago I was invited along to the Valrhona USA headquarters to have a play with their new inspiration line! Turns out it's just in Brooklyn, same as me! This is what happens when you don't get out much - you don't realise things are just under your nose. Anyways, it was a super fun night, we got to meet their amazing pastry chef who showed us all sorts of fancy things, and we learnt all about their new line of fruit and nut couvertures (which is a fancy name for chocolate with a high cocoa butter content). They have recently released an almond and a passionfruit (!!) flavour, both of which taste insanely good, and also happen to be vegan if that sort of thing floats your boat. The release of these is going to be an exciting new development for vegan desserts, but also super exciting for people like me who are addicted to passionfruit, but also equally sad that they are almost impossible to get hold of here in NYC. So this is the next best option. The Passionfruit couverture is made with cocoa butter and passionfruit juice, meaning that it has an insanely punchy passionfruit taste, with the flavour not being drowned out by sugar as it would be in a nectar or juice. 

One of the things that we were shown while we were there was a passionfruit magic shell. Magic shell is essentially chocolate warmed with a neutral oil, which means that when it comes into contact with something cold (like ice cream), it solidifies into an amazing, crunchy crackly shell. The pastry chef had made a passionfruit magic shell, which we dipped teeny little perfect bars of coconut sorbet into. My mind was blown, and I knew it had to be replicated at home, and so here we are! 

I wanted to kind of keep the same flavour profile going as we tasted at Valrhona, but wanted to make it an ice cream base rather than a sorbet (because I like to think I'm fancy, but I'm not that fancy). So, I went with a toasted coconut ice cream - essentially an anglaise (custard), which you infuse overnight with toasted coconut before churning in your ice cream maker and freezing into popsicle moulds. Once they have frozen down, I took them out of the moulds, let them chill out in the freezer for a bit, and then melted down some grapeseed oil and the passionfruit chocolate, let it cool, then dunked the pops in. It's kind of stressful to dunk but also super fun to watch the shell set almost immediately into a perfectly smooth form. I then drizzled them with some white chocolate (totally optional but another step to make you look fancy), and we were all done! The toastyness of the coconut ice cream paired so perfectly with the punchy chocolate shell - these are going to be firmly on repeat whenever I feel the need to impress someone. 

A few wee tips:

  • The toasted coconut ice cream base ideally needs overnight to infuse the coconut flavour, so you will need to account for this. If you are in a pinch you can just chill it down with the coconut, and once chilled, strain it out. 
  • I made the magic shell using Valrhona Passionfruit Couverture, but if you aren't able to get that, a white chocolate, or milk / dark chocolate would also make an amazing magic shell coating to pair with the toasted coconut. The ratio for the magic shell is approximately 1 part neutral oil to 5 parts chocolate, by weight.
  • These are the pop moulds that I used. I love how fancy they look, and they are the perfect size! This recipe will work in any pop mould though!
 

 

Toasted Coconut Ice Cream Pops with Passionfruit Magic Shell

- Makes about 7 pops -

Magic Shell recipe from Valrhona Pastry Chef, Sarah Tibbets

Toasted Coconut Ice Cream
150g unsweetened shredded coconut
475g whole milk
350g heavy cream
6 egg yolks
200g sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla bean paste
1/4 tsp salt
 

Passionfruit magic shell
400g Passionfruit Couverture
80g grape seed oil

Melted white chocolate, to drizzle

 

- PROCESS -

TOASTED COCONUT ICE CREAM

Preheat the oven to 350˚f / 180˚c. Spread 50g of the shredded coconut onto a baking sheet, and bake for 8-10 minutes, stirring frequently, until toasted and golden. Remove and allow to cool.

In a medium saucepan, whisk together the milk and cream. Place over medium high heat, and bring to just shy of a simmer. Meanwhile, whisk together the egg yolks, sugar, vanilla and salt until the mixture lightens in colour.

Remove the milk mixture from the heat, and whisking constantly, pour about half of it into the egg yolk mixture to temper the yolks. Mix well to combine, then pour back into the saucepan, and place over medium low heat. Heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture coats the back of a spoon and reads 175˚f / 80˚c on a thermometer. Strain into a container, and stir in the toasted and untoasted coconut. leave to sit at room temperature for an hour, then cover and place in the fridge for at least four hours, until it has cooled to at least 40˚f / 5˚c. Strain the mixture through a sieve to remove the coconut, pressing down hard to remove as much of the liquid as possible.

Transfer the cooled ice cream base to your ice cream maker and churn according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Divide the ice cream mixture evenly amongst your ice cream moulds. Add sticks and freeze until solid, ideally overnight.

PASSIONFRUIT MAGIC SHELL

Create a double boiler by placing a heatproof bowl over a pot of simmering water. Do not let the bowl touch the water. Place the Passionfruit Couverture and the grape seed oil in the bowl, and stir well, heating until the mixture is smooth and cohesive. Remove the bowl from the pot, ensuring no water gets into the mixture, and set aside to cool to 37˚c / 98˚f. Transfer to a narrow jar or glass which is wide enough and deep enough to dunk your ice cream pops. 

ASSEMBLY

Place a sheet pan lined with a silpat or baking paper into the freezer. Carefully unmould the ice cream pops, and place back into the freezer while you prepare and cool the magic shell. 

Working with one at a time, dip an ice cream pop into the jar of magic shell, ensuring that it is evenly coated. Allow any excess to drip off, then place back onto the sheet pan in the freezer (I like to do this near the freezer, only bringing one pop out at a time). Repeat with the remaining pops until all are coated. Allow to sit in the freezer for another 10 minutes to firm up completely before drizzling with melted white chocolate. If needed, add a little grape seed oil to the white chocolate to help make it easier to drizzle.

Store leftovers in an airtight container in the freezer. 

 

Toasted Coconut Ice Cream Pops with Passionfruit magic shell - a creamy toasted coconut ice cream is dipped in a punchy passionfruit magic shell. Quite possibly the most perfect ice cream combination you will ever come across. #passionfruit #toastedcoconut #icecreampop #icecream #magicshell

Lemon meringue pie ice cream pops


 
Lemon Meringue pie ice cream pops - if pie and ice cream had a baby, this would be it. The perfect combination of punchy lemon curd ice cream, pie crumb, and toasty meringue.
Lemon Meringue pie ice cream pops - if pie and ice cream had a baby, this would be it. The perfect combination of punchy lemon curd ice cream, pie crumb, and toasty meringue.
Lemon Meringue pie ice cream pops - if pie and ice cream had a baby, this would be it. The perfect combination of punchy lemon curd ice cream, pie crumb, and toasty meringue.
Lemon Meringue pie ice cream pops - if pie and ice cream had a baby, this would be it. The perfect combination of punchy lemon curd ice cream, pie crumb, and toasty meringue.
Lemon Meringue pie ice cream pops - if pie and ice cream had a baby, this would be it. The perfect combination of punchy lemon curd ice cream, pie crumb, and toasty meringue.
Lemon Meringue pie ice cream pops - if pie and ice cream had a baby, this would be it. The perfect combination of punchy lemon curd ice cream, pie crumb, and toasty meringue.
Lemon Meringue pie ice cream pops - if pie and ice cream had a baby, this would be it. The perfect combination of punchy lemon curd ice cream, pie crumb, and toasty meringue.
Lemon Meringue pie ice cream pops - if pie and ice cream had a baby, this would be it. The perfect combination of punchy lemon curd ice cream, pie crumb, and toasty meringue.
Lemon Meringue pie ice cream pops - if pie and ice cream had a baby, this would be it. The perfect combination of punchy lemon curd ice cream, pie crumb, and toasty meringue.
Lemon Meringue pie ice cream pops - if pie and ice cream had a baby, this would be it. The perfect combination of punchy lemon curd ice cream, pie crumb, and toasty meringue.

Happy happy Popsicle Week! This time last year I had just started my blog and had no clue whatsoever what popsicle week was, or why so many people were posting them all at once. Eventually I worked it out, and spent the week with mild FOMO and low key stalking all the posts. This time around, I was more than ready! This year there are a zillion of us posting popsicles this week! You can check out all of the posts here (there's some amazing ones there already!), or check out the hashtag on Instagram. Big ups to Billy of Wit and Vinegar for doing an amazing job rounding everyone up! 

I've been wanting to make a lemon meringue pie for a while now. However it is currently a million degrees in our apartment, which is the least ideal temperature for working with pastry, so I abandoned that idea, and turned the pie into a popsicle. And it was probably one of the best decisions I could have made. I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that these are some of the best things that I have made. It's a big call, but I'm going for it. Kick-you-in-the-face punchy lemon curd is churned with a vanilla bean ice cream base. The mixture is then transferred to popsicle moulds, where it is layered with a pie-crumb streusel situation. Once the pops are set, they are swirled with swiss meringue and torched to toasty perfection. The result tastes like the love child of pie and ice cream. The creamy vanilla ice cream mellows the curd, the pie crumb adds crunch and a tiny bit of salt, and the meringue is just way too fun because who doesn't like burning things. I sent these to the studio with Rich once I had made them, and one of our staff described them as "if an ice cream truck was serving these, I would run down the street after it". I'll definitely take that. 

On the grand scheme of popsicles, these are fairly involved. You have to make the ice cream base, curd, pie crumb and meringue all separately, but trust me on this when I tell you that it is SO worth it. Surprisingly, the meringue lasts in the freezer for a couple of days, so you can store any leftovers on a baking tray. However if you were only wanting to add meringue to the ones you are serving, the ice cream with the pie crumbs makes a pretty epic popsicle on its own. The recipe I have given does make more ice cream than you will need for the popsicles, but I am including the full recipe anyway, because, for no extra work, you also get a tub of lovely lemon ice cream, and some pie crumbs to sprinkle on top!

Ps: The nominations for the Saveur blog awards have just opened up and I would love if you snuck over there and flicked me a cheeky nomination! I'm still young enough for the "best new voice" category but feel free to go for whatever you think is best ;) x

A few wee notes: 

  • The recipe will make more than enough for 12 popsicles, however I only made 6 because I only have a 6-pack popsicle mould. Either way you will end up with extra ice cream - pop into a freezer safe container to go back to once the popsicles are done! It takes no extra work, and you get extra dessert. What more could you want.
  • Because you aren't cooking the meringue it is important to use a method that 'cooks' the egg whites before you whip them - I went with Swiss. Make sure you take it to at least 70˚c / 160˚f.
  • Make sure you freeze your ice cream maker the night before you plan to make these! 
  • I use this popsicle mould! It was kind of spendy but totally worth it after wasting money on a series of terrible ones.
  • The curd and the ice cream do use up a lot of egg yolks - some of this is used in the meringue, but if you wanted you could make extra meringue and pipe it out or spoon onto a lined baking tray and bake off to make meringues! The ratio of whites to sugar is 1 part whites to 1.5 parts sugar, and the method is the same.
 

 

Lemon meringue Ice cream pops
- Makes 12 pops -

Pie crumb recipe from Milk Bar

Ice cream base
4 large egg yolks
2/3 cup (135g) sugar
1 1/2 cups (360ml) whole milk
1 Tbsp vanilla paste, or the seeds from 1 vanilla bean
1 1/2 cups (360ml) heavy whipping cream

Lemon Curd
2/3 cup (160ml) lemon juice
1 1/2 Tbsp finely grated lemon zest
2/3 cup (135g) sugar
8 egg yolks
6 Tbsp (90g) butter

Pie Crumb
440g (3 cups) flour
36g (4 Tbsp) sugar
6g (1 1/2 tsp) salt
230g (2 sticks) butter, browned
40g (3 Tbsp) water

Swiss meringue
150g egg whites
225g granulated sugar
 

- PROCESS -

ICE CREAM BASE

In a medium bowl, combine the egg yolks and sugar. Whisk well until pale. Set aside. 

In a large pot over medium heat, combine the whole milk and vanilla paste. Warm until bubbles begin to form around the outer edge of the pot. Bring to a light simmer. Remove from the heat.

Pour half of the milk into the bowl with the egg yolks, whisking constantly. Whisk briskly until combined. This will temper the egg yolks and stop them from scrambling. 

Pour the milk yolk mixture back into the pot, and return to a low heat. Whisk constantly, until the mixture begins to thicken enough to coat the back of a spoon, and registers at 170˚f / 75˚c on a thermometer. 

Strain though a fine mesh strainer. Stir in the cream. Transfer to an airtight container and chill for at least two hours, or overnight.

 

LEMON CURD

Place a heatproof bowl over a pot of simmering water, ensuring that the water does not touch the bottom of the bowl. Combine all of the ingredients, whisking often. Watch the edges of the mixture carefully to ensure that it does not catch and go lumpy. 

Heat until the mixture is thick enough that when you coat the back of a spoon with curd, you can drag a finger through it, and leave a clear track. Transfer to a bowl or container, then transfer to the fridge to cool completely.

 

PIE CRUMB

Preheat the oven to 350f/180c. Line a baking tray with silpat or parchment paper. 

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the flour, sugar and salt until well mixed. Add the butter and water and mix on low until clustered. 

Spread the mixture on the tray, and bake for 25 minutes, until golden brown. Break up into smaller clumps during the baking process. Remove from the oven and allow to cool (it will firm up a lot during cooling). Store in an airtight container until ready to use

 

ASSEMBLY

Add the ice cream base to the bowl of your ice cream maker. Churn according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 5 minutes of churning, add in the cooled lemon curd. 

Once the ice cream is churned, transfer to a piping bag fitted with a round tip, or with the end cut off. Fill your popsicle molds 1/3 of the way, then add a tablespoon of the pie crumb to each mold. Use the back of a spoon to lightly mix the crumb and ice cream. Repeat this process with the next 1/3 of the mold, then top off with ice cream. Place sticks into the pops and place in the freezer to harden, at least 2-3 hours. 

Once you are ready to serve the pops, run each mold under hot water for a few seconds to help release. Transfer the pops to a lined baking tray and place back into the freezer for a further 20-30 minutes while you make the meringue.

To serve, spread meringue on the top 2/3 of the pop using an offset spatula. Torch lightly using a blowtorch. Serve immediately. Torched pops are best eaten straight away, but will last for a few days in the freezer on a lined baking tray.

 

SWISS MERINGUE

Measure the egg whites and granulated sugar into the bowl of a stand mixer or other heatproof bowl. Place over a pot of simmering water, ensuring that the water does not touch the bottom of the bowl. Heat the mixture, whisking often and watching the edges carefully, until it no longer feels gritty when rubbed between your fingers, and it registers at least 70˚c / 160˚f on a thermometer. 

Carefully transfer to a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Whip on high speed until stiff peaks form, approximately 5-6 minutes. 

Lemon Meringue pie ice cream pops - if pie and ice cream had a baby, this would be it. The perfect combination of punchy lemon curd ice cream, pie crumb, and toasty meringue.

Sage salted caramel ice-cream pops


 
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
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Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel
Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel

I got a couple of exciting things in the mail the last few weeks. I finally took the plunge and got an ice cream attachment for my kitchenaid, and, because it's finally starting to feel warm here, which means it's nearly ice-block season, I got a popsicle mould that doesn't suck like my last one did! 

The most exciting thing that came in the mail though, which prompted the purchase of the other items, was the lovely Lily's new book! I have yet to meet Lily in person, although we have met over facetime a month or so ago when I offered up Richard's adobe expertise (poor guy, it happens often), and I can't wait to finally meet IRL one day! Lily has a beautiful wee corner of the internet where she shares amazing recipes, and her book is the most perfect extension of that. I've already made the roasted strawberry and basil cream pie, and I am eyeing up loads more recipes to make in the coming months. 

Lily's book is everything I imagined it to be, and so much more (Plus it arrived packaged with a bag of lavender oat bath soak, meaning that it also smells amazing). It is divided into chapters by herbs, and each recipe is accompanied by an amazing story. Although the first thing I made from the book was from the basil chapter, I had been eyeing up the sage section since long before this book was released. And it did NOT disappoint. I took my ice cream maker and popsicle moulds on their maiden voyage, and made the sage salted caramel ice-cream from the book. The recipe in the book is just for regular ice-cream, but I couldn't resist popping some into my new moulds, just to make sure they worked! 

This is quite possibly one of the best ice-creams I have ever tasted. It starts with a sage salted caramel (which is amazing in itself, and i'm totally making again to put on everything), which is then added to a sage infused custard. The whole lot then takes a twirl in the ice cream maker, and the result is nothing short of incredible. It is rich, but also delicately flavoured. The sage cuts through the creaminess perfectly, and the whole thing is rounded off by a drizzle of extra caramel. I made it both in a freezer-safe container as scoop-able ice cream, and also in the moulds to make ice-cream pops. Both worked perfectly!

 

 

Sage Salted Caramel ice-cream pops
- Makes 6 pops, or 1 quart of ice-cream -

Printed with permission from Kale and Caramel

Sage Salted Caramel
1 1/2 cups (300g) granulated sugar or coconut sugar (I used 1 cup granulated and 1/2 cup coconut)
1/4 cup (60ml) water
1/2 cup (120ml) heavy cream, at room temperature
1/2 tsp salt
approx. 20 fresh sage leaves

Ice cream base
3/4 cup sage salted caramel
2 egg yolks
2 cups (480ml) heavy cream
1 1/2 cups (360ml) whole milk
1/2 tsp vanilla bean paste
1/4 tsp salt
approx. 60 fresh sage leaves
 

- PROCESS -

Freeze the bowl of your ice-cream maker overnight. 

SAGE SALTED CARAMEL

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, stir the coconut sugar and water until the sugar dissolves. Raise the heat to medium-high and bring to a boil, swirling occasionally. Cook for 2-3 minutes total, until amber in colour, or until the mixture measures 225˚f / 107˚c on a candy thermometer (Note - if you are using granulated sugar, this process will take longer than if you are using coconut sugar). Remove from the heat and add the heavy cream and salt, whisking until combined. Add the sage leaves, and steep for 25 minutes. Strain to remove the sage leaves. Let the caramel cool for at least 20 minutes.

ICE CREAM

Whisk the egg yolks in a medium bowl. In a large saucepan, whisk together 3/4 cup of the sage salted caramel (reserve the rest for drizzling) with the heavy cream, milk, vanilla, egg yolks and salt. Whisk until steam rises. Add the sage leaves. 

Cook over a low heat until it measures 170˚f / 77˚c on a thermometer, or until it thickens slightly and coats the back of the spoon. Taste to see if you've reached the desired level of sage-iness, and if so, strain out the sage leaves. If not, leave the sage leaves in to steep while the custard cools (I left them in and it turned out perfectly). Transfer to a covered container, and refrigerate until cooled completely. 

Once chilled, if the sage is still in the custard, strain it out and discard. Freeze in an ice cream maker, according to the manufacturer's instructions, until the consistency is smooth and thick.

Transfer to a freezer-safe, airtight container or popsicle moulds, and allow to freeze for at least 6 hours before serving. 

To serve, top with the reserved sage salted caramel.

Sage salted caramel Ice-cream pops from Lily Diamond's new book, Kale and Caramel

Recipe is Copyright © 2017 by Lily Diamond from KALE & CARAMEL: Recipes for Body, Heart, and Table published by Atria Books, a division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.