New Year's Macarons with Vanilla Bean Swiss Meringue Buttercream and Pop Rocks


 
New Year's Macarons with Vanilla Bean Swiss Meringue Buttercream and Pop Rocks. Light, sparkly, and perfect for ringing in the new year.
New Year's Macarons with Vanilla Bean Swiss Meringue Buttercream and Pop Rocks. Light, sparkly, and perfect for ringing in the new year.
New Year's Macarons with Vanilla Bean Swiss Meringue Buttercream and Pop Rocks. Light, sparkly, and perfect for ringing in the new year.
New Year's Macarons with Vanilla Bean Swiss Meringue Buttercream and Pop Rocks. Light, sparkly, and perfect for ringing in the new year.
New Year's Macarons with Vanilla Bean Swiss Meringue Buttercream and Pop Rocks. Light, sparkly, and perfect for ringing in the new year.
New Year's Macarons with Vanilla Bean Swiss Meringue Buttercream and Pop Rocks. Light, sparkly, and perfect for ringing in the new year.
New Year's Macarons with Vanilla Bean Swiss Meringue Buttercream and Pop Rocks. Light, sparkly, and perfect for ringing in the new year.

New Year, uhhh new macaron. There’s not much to say about these ones except they are a bit fancy and very delicious. We took our regular Vanilla Bean French Macaron shell, popped some New Years themed sprinkles on top, then filled it with cute wee blobs of Vanilla Bean Swiss Meringue Buttercream, and finished it off with a pop rock centre for a little post NYE fireworks.

This is Jase and I’s 11th Macaron recipe - we set out to share one a month for a year, and the other day we decided that we might as well keep this going until one of us leaves NYC. We aren’t planning to go for at least two years, so I’m excited to see how quickly we run out of ideas. Lolz. We were joking the other day that us making macarons was kind of like us dating to see if we could be friends - and damn I am happy we started dating. It’s so amazing having someone just around the corner (quite literally - it’s a 6 minute walk from my door to his), who loves to stay home just as much as I do, someone to bounce ideas off of and to work in coffee shops with. I am so, so lucky to have met so many amazing people through the internet - I didn’t know anyone except for Richard when I moved here, so it’s a great feeling to have carved out my own little space here in NYC.

A few wee tips:

  • Everything I know about macarons (all the tips and tricks we have learnt along the way) can be found in this post.

  • Be careful when you are choosing sprinkles to use - if they are solid sugar or chocolate balls, they may get hot and melt through the shells. Go for small balls and baubles in your sprinkles mix if you can!

  • We added pop rocks just to give a little fancy finish, but this step is totally optional!

 

 

New Years Macarons with Vanilla Bean Swiss Meringue Buttercream and Pop Rocks

- Makes about 24 Macarons -

Macaron Shell Recipe from I love Macarons, with adaptations from Fox and Crane 

Macaron Shells
170g ground almonds
300g powdered sugar
180g egg whites, at room temperature
160g sugar
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
Sprinkles to finish (we used some from Fancy Sprinkles)

Vanilla Bean Swiss Meringue Buttercream
1/2 cup (123g) egg whites, or 4 large egg whites
1 cup (200g) granulated sugar
1/4 tsp kosher salt
455g (16oz, or four sticks) unsalted butter, cold and cut into small pieces
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
Gel Food Colour as desired
Strawberry (Or your choice of flavour) pop rocks, optional

 

- PROCESS -

MACARON SHELLS

Preheat oven to 300˚f / 150˚c, and position the oven rack in the centre of the oven. Using a round cookie cutter or the base of a large piping tip (something about 1.5 inches in diameter), draw a "template" for your macarons on a piece of parchment paper, leaving about 3/4" between each circle. 

Combine the almond meal and powdered sugar together in a large bowl. Sift the mixture twice, to ensure there are no large lumps and that the mixture is properly aerated. Set aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the egg whites on medium speed until foamy. Gradually add the sugar, increase the mixer speed, and whip on high until the meringue starts to firm up. Add vanilla and mix until incorporated. Continue to whip until the meringue forms stiff peaks (there is a good example here). 

Remove the bowl from the mixer. Add half of the ground almond and powdered sugar mixture, and fold into the meringue. You want to deflate the meringue just a little at this stage, to combine the meringue and ground almond mixture. 

Add the remaining ground almond mixture, and stir lightly to combine. Now comes the important part - mixing the batter to the correct consistency. Again, this video does a good job of explaining it. Fold the mixture in a series of 'turns', deflating the batter by spreading it against the side of the bowl. Turn the bowl slightly and repeat the movement - scooping the batter from the bottom of the bowl, and spreading it against the side. Continuously check the consistency of the batter - you want it to flow like lava when you lift the spatula from the bowl, and you should be able to 'draw' a figure 8 with it, without the batter breaking (again, watch lots of videos to get an idea! They help so much). This step can take some practice until you know what it should feel and look like. If in doubt you are better to under mix them than over mix them - the process of putting the batter into the bag and piping out will help mix a little too.

Fit a large pastry bag with a medium sized round tip, such as an ateco #805. Place the macaron template on a sheet pan, and place a second piece of parchment over it. Holding the piping bag at a 90˚ angle to the surface, pipe out the batter into blobs the size of the circles drawn on the template. Finish off each piped circle with a little "flick" of your wrist to minimise the batter forming a point (it will still form a small one, but we can get rid of this with banging). Remove the template from under the macarons.

Hold the baking sheet in two hands, and carefully but firmly, evenly bang it against the bench. Repeat this a few more times - this will get rid of any air bubbles, remove points on the top, and help them to spread out slightly.  Sprinkle the shells with sprinkles of your choice.

Repeat the piping and banging process until you have used up all of the batter - I usually make three sheet pans worth. 

Allow the macarons to dry at room temperature for approximately 30 minutes, or until they form a skin that you can touch without your finger sticking to them. This time will drastically vary depending on the humidity. 

About fifteen minutes before you are going to bake the macarons, place a spare sheet pan in the oven to preheat - this is going to be used to place under the pan with the macarons on it, to double up, which should help with even baking. Bake the macarons one sheet at a time - place the sheet with the macarons on the preheated sheet, and place in the oven. 

Bake for approximately 18 minutes, rotating the pan once during the cooking process, and checking for doneness after 15 minutes. The macarons should develop a foot (the ruffled part on the bottom of the macaron), and bake without browning. To see if they are done - press down lightly on a shell. If the foot gives way, it needs a little longer, if it is stable, then it is close to being done. Test a macaron shell - if you can peel it away cleanly from the paper, they are done. If they are stable but cannot yet peel away cleanly, give them another minute or so. Again, this part takes a little trial and error depending on your oven. If they seem done but do not peel away cleanly, do not worry - there is a little trick for that! 

Remove from the oven, and allow to cool on the sheet pan for 10 minutes before peeling off the parchment paper and allowing to cool completely on a wire rack. Repeat the baking with the remaining trays, using the same spare sheet pan to double up.

If your macs do not peel away cleanly, place them, on the parchment paper, into the freezer for 5-10 minutes, then peel away from the paper. 

Store cooled macarons in an airtight container until ready to use. 

 

VANILLA BEAN SWISS MERINGUE BUTTERCREAM

Place the egg whites, sugar and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer or a heat proof bowl. Place over a pot of simmering water, ensuring that the water does not touch the bowl. Heat, whisking constantly, until the mixture registers 160˚f / 70˚c on a thermometer and the sugar has dissolved. Carefully transfer the bowl to the mixer, and fit with the whisk attachment. Whip the egg whites on high until they are snowy white and fluffy, 8-10 minutes. Add the butter one chunk at a time. The mixture may look curdled - but just keep mixing! Once all the butter is incorporated, mix on high for a further 10 minutes. Add the vanilla and mix until incorporated.

Once the buttercream has finished mixing, and is smooth and silky, add in the vanilla bean paste. Mix for a further 2-3 minutes, then switch to the paddle attachment and mix on low for one minute to remove any air.

Divide the buttercream into four, and colour three of the portions with your desired gel food colour (we used blue, pink and purple to match the sprinkles, and left one white). Transfer to piping bags fitted with small french star piping tips.

ASSEMBLY

Pair up each macaron shell with another of an equal size. Pipe small blobs of the coloured buttercream on one half of the shell, then sprinkle with some pop rocks. Place the second shell carefully on top. Repeat with the rest of the macarons. Macarons are best chilled overnight to allow the flavours to meld, but can also be eaten immediately. 

New Year's Macarons with Vanilla Bean Swiss Meringue Buttercream and Pop Rocks. Light, sparkly, and perfect for ringing in the new year.

Chocolate Brownie Cake with Chocolate Hazelnut filling and Mocha German Buttercream


 
Chocolate Brownie Cake with Chocolate Hazelnut filling and Mocha German Buttercream - perfectly indulgent.
Chocolate Brownie Cake with Chocolate Hazelnut filling and Mocha German Buttercream - perfectly indulgent.
Chocolate Brownie Cake with Chocolate Hazelnut filling and Mocha German Buttercream - perfectly indulgent.
Chocolate Brownie Cake with Chocolate Hazelnut filling and Mocha German Buttercream - perfectly indulgent.
Chocolate Brownie Cake with Chocolate Hazelnut filling and Mocha German Buttercream - perfectly indulgent.
Chocolate Brownie Cake with Chocolate Hazelnut filling and Mocha German Buttercream - perfectly indulgent.

I just checked, and I haven’t posted a layer cake in the LONGEST time. Like, in almost a year. Whoopsies. Hopefully posting a super extravagant one will make up for it? Anyway, I don’t intend on leaving it that long again, because I forgot just how fun making layer cakes can be.

This has to be one of the best cakes I have ever made. I took a bunch of my favourite things, and combined them into one perfect (to me) cake. Fudgy brownie cake layers, sandwiched with chocolate hazelnut filling, and a silky mocha German buttercream. I finished it with some fancy gold leaf and buttercream stripes (more on that new technique later), and what has become somewhat of a signature move from me - some french star tip piping. The flavours compliment each other perfectly - the chocolate hazelnut filling is so delicious against fudgy cake layers and silky silky mocha German buttercream. If you haven’t tried German buttercream you should - I love that you can infuse it with whatever you like, in this case some strong coffee. I whipped some melted chocolate into it, and it became almost like room temperature ice cream - silky and amazing. So tempting to eat with a spoon, but even more magical layered into the cake.

It only made sense to then pop it on my favourite cake stand - made by the lovely Amy from Aheirloom. We have been good friends for a while now, and it’s amazing having someone to bounce ideas off and complain about the internet with. The stand I used here is one I’ve been looking forward to for the longest time - the cake plate is 8” in diameter, which makes it perfect to pop 6” cakes on. To kick off the new year, we are giving away two of these cake stands, one here and one over on Instagram! All you have to do is make sure you are following both Aheirloom and I on Instagram, then leave a comment letting me know your favourite type of cake! Competition is open until Friday 25th of January at 8pm EST, and is open to US residents only. Happy caking! x

A few wee tips:

  • Both the chocolate hazelnut filling and the pastry cream do need some time to cool, so I like to prepare those the day ahead if I can. The layers of the brownie can also be made ahead - I like to wrap the cooled layers in plastic wrap and store in the fridge overnight so they are nice and cool for assembly.

  • The recipe for the chocolate hazelnut filling will make more than you need, but it is an amazing thing to have on hand for no extra effort - store it in an airtight container at room temperature. I use it in a few recipes on the blog - this babka and also these brownie bites, but it is perfect just used like nutella

  • I gave this cake stripes - I followed this tutorial, using an icing comb. They are a little tricky but they come out super cute. I have included instructions in the recipe for dividing up the buttercream for this, which gives you some coffee buttercream and some mocha, which is a really nice variation in taste. If you don’t want to add stripes, assemble the cake using the mocha buttercream, then add blobs of the coffee on the outside. You can also just skip the step of reserving some coffee buttercream, and make one batch of mocha buttercream to use.

  • Once you refrigerate the cake, the chocolate hazelnut filling will harden slightly - but it becomes this amazing dense nutella like layer. Make sure you make a good buttercream dam to hold in the chocolate hazelnut filling between layers - if it seems like it is leaking out, quickly patch up the hole and then freeze the cake for 10-15 minutes to help solidify.

  • These are my favourite cake pans! I have them in both 6” and 8”. I have 3 of each, which makes making layer cakes so much easier than having to divide one cake into several layers.

 

 

Chocolate Brownie Cake with Chocolate Hazelnut filling and Mocha German Buttercream

- Makes one six inch, three layer cake, serves 8-10 -

Buttercream Stripe method from Brittany May Cakes

Chocolate Brownie Cake
125g unsalted butter
250g good quality dark chocolate, at least 70% cocoa solids, roughly chopped
200g sugar
135g dark brown sugar
5 eggs, at room temperature
1 tsp vanilla extract or vanilla bean paste
125g neutral oil
100g all-purpose flour
100g cocoa powder
3/4 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt

Chocolate Hazelnut Filling
280g (2 cups) raw hazelnuts
424g (1 1/2 cups) melted dark chocolate (at least 70%)
200g (1 cup) sugar
1 tsp kosher salt


Mocha German Buttercream
375g Whole milk
35g (4 Tbsp) coarsely ground coffee
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
24g corn starch
225g sugar
1 egg
2 egg yolks
675g unsalted butter (6 sticks), at room temperature
300g 70% dark chocolate, melted and cooled

 

- PROCESS -

CHOCOLATE BROWNIE CAKE

Preheat the oven to 350° / 180°. Grease and line three six inch cake pans with parchment paper.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, heat the butter and chocolate, stirring constantly, until melted and combined. Set aside to cool.

In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, and salt.

In a large bowl, whisk together the sugar, dark brown sugar, eggs, vanilla, and oil. Add the cooled chocolate mixture, and mix to combine. Add the dry ingredients, and gently fold to combine.

Divide the batter between the three cake pans, and bang once or twice on the counter to help settle.

Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, checking for doneness after 20 minutes, until a the top of the cakes are set, and skewer inserted in the middle of the cake comes out with a few crumbs attached.

Cool in the tins for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and allow to cool completely. If you are making ahead, once cool, wrap tightly in plastic wrap and store in the fridge until you are ready to assemble the cake.

 

CHOCOLATE HAZELNUT FILLING

Preheat the oven to 350˚f / 180˚c. Place the hazelnuts on a baking sheet. Roast in the oven, shaking occasionally, for 8-10 mins, checking often, until the are golden brown. Allow to cool completely, then rub between your hands to remove the skins. Do not worry about any stubborn skins. Transfer to the work bowl of a food processor, and pulse briefly to chop. 

Add the melted dark chocolate, sugar, and salt. Pulse to combine, then mix on high speed for at least five minutes. Check, and give more time mixing if needed. Transfer to a container and store at room temperature until you are ready to use. 

MOCHA GERMAN BUTTERCREAM

In a medium saucepan, heat the milk to just shy of a simmer.  Remove from the heat, add the coffee, stir well, and steep for 20 minutes. Strain through a very fine mesh sieve, and re-weigh the infused milk and top up to 375g. Wipe out the saucepan, and return to the milk mixture to the heat. Bring to just shy of a simmer. Meanwhile, In a bowl, whisk together the vanilla, corn starch, sugar, egg, egg yolk and salt.

Using one hand to whisk constantly, pour half of the hot milk mixture into the egg mixture. This helps to temper the eggs and stop them from scrambling. Whisk until incorporated, and then pour the whole lot back into the saucepan.

Heat the milk and egg mixture over medium heat, whisking constantly, until it begins to bubble. It will thicken quickly. Once it has thickened, cook for one minute, then remove from the heat. Pour into a shallow container or bowl of a stand mixer and press some plastic wrap over the surface to avoid a skin from forming. Refrigerate until cold - at least four hours, preferably overnight. If you need to speed this process up, you can place the pastry cream in a bowl, then place the bowl in an ice bath. Stir frequently.

Fit your mixer with the whisk attachment, and place the pastry cream in the bowl. Whip the mixture on medium until creamy and lump-free. Begin adding the butter, a few cubes at a time, until fully incorporated. It may look curdled at some point but just keep whipping - it will come together! Whip for a further 2 minutes.

Remove 250g of the coffee buttercream, and transfer to a piping bag (do not snip the end off just yet). Add the cooled chocolate to the remaining coffee buttercream left in the mixer, and mix to combine.

ASSEMBLY

If the cakes domed in the oven, level them a little with a sharp bread knife. Transfer some of the mocha buttercream to a piping bag fitted with a medium round tip - this will be used to make a buttercream dam to hold in the chocolate filling between layers.

Secure one of the layers of cake to a cake turntable using a little buttercream. Add about half a cup of mocha buttercream onto the first layer of cake, and smooth using an offset spatula. Create a buttercream dam using the buttercream in the piping bag by piping a ring of frosting around the outside edge of the first layer. Fill in the ring with approximately 1/3 cup of the hazelnut filling. Place the second layer of cake onto the first, pressing very lightly to secure, and sealing the joins with a thin layer of buttercream. Repeat the layering process - add half a cup of buttercream, make a dam, fill with 1/3 cup hazelnut filling, then top with the third layer of cake - I like to put this one upside down to ensure that the top of the cake is flat.

Crumb coat the cake - to do this, apply a thin layer of buttercream over the surface of the cake, and smooth with a bench scraper or icing smoother. Refrigerate the cake for 30-45 minutes, until the crumb coat has set.

To ice without stripes (see notes): Cover the cake with a second, thicker layer of mocha buttercream. Smooth. Decorate as desired.

To ice with stripes: (see this highlight for more details / photos) Apply a thick layer of buttercream, and smooth completely, ensuring that there are no holes and it is completely smooth. Chill 15 minutes. Using a warmed icing comb (run under hot water then dry), go around the cake, creating grooves in your buttercream. Make sure that the grooves are sharp edged and deep - you may have to do a few passes to ensure this.

Freeze the cake for 30 minutes, then, using the reserved coffee buttercream, snip a small hole off the end of the piping bag, and pipe coffee buttercream into the grooves. Do not be afraid to overfill slightly. Once you have filled all of the grooves, smooth the cake using a warmed cake scraper, wiping between passes. Chill the cake for 10-20 minutes.

Place the remainder of the buttercream in piping bags fitted with french star tips (ateco #866 is my favourite) - I did one for the mocha buttercream, one for the coffee buttercream, and one for the excess scraped off from smoothing off the stripes, which was marbled.

Add gold leaf to the cake where desired, then pipe blobs of buttercream randomly over the surface of the cake, as desired.

Chill cake until ready to serve, then bring out of the fridge to come to room temperature about an hour before you serve. Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge.

Chocolate Brownie Cake with Chocolate Hazelnut filling and Mocha German Buttercream - perfectly indulgent.

Roasted Pear and Vanilla Bean Scones with Salty Honey Glaze


 
Roasted Pear and Vanilla Bean Scones with Salty Honey Glaze - Giant Craggy Scones filled with pear chunks held together with tender scone dough, and finished with a sticky honey glaze and a generous dose of flaky sea salt.
Roasted Pear and Vanilla Bean Scones with Salty Honey Glaze - Giant Craggy Scones filled with pear chunks held together with tender scone dough, and finished with a sticky honey glaze and a generous dose of flaky sea salt.
Roasted Pear and Vanilla Bean Scones with Salty Honey Glaze - Giant Craggy Scones filled with pear chunks held together with tender scone dough, and finished with a sticky honey glaze and a generous dose of flaky sea salt.
Roasted Pear and Vanilla Bean Scones with Salty Honey Glaze - Giant Craggy Scones filled with pear chunks held together with tender scone dough, and finished with a sticky honey glaze and a generous dose of flaky sea salt.

Hi! Happy New Year! Sorry for going a bit quiet over here - I took some time off, and then couldn’t quite kick myself back into a routine. This time of the year is always a little weird for me, as I tend to get super homesick (I’m sure that the cold doesn’t help either), which tends to trigger anxiety, and I then find it super hard to get anything done. It happens every year and I’m always surprised, until Mum reminds me (every year) that it does, and I have to just remind myself to go a little easy just for a bit. Once I manage to get myself back into routine it usually sorts itself out, and I am super happy to have found my baking mojo again! I can’t wait to share some super fun things with you this year - there are some awesome things lined up!

These roasted pear and salted honey scones are inspired by some I ate when I spent 24 hours in Portland, Maine in October last year. I got up early and made my way to Tandem Coffee and bakery, which is a crazy cute little cafe and bakery. I plopped myself in the corner with a book, ate the best breakfast sandwich I think I will ever have in my life, and then grabbed a scone to go as I was leaving for the airport. And oh man am I glad I did. The scone had giant chunks of pear, held together by tender scone dough, and was topped with a salty honey situation that rounded it all off so, so perfectly. I knew I had to immediately recreate them, so here we are (like, 3 months later haha).

Because pear, like most fruit, releases liquid when it bakes, I decided to roast the pear chunks slightly first to help get rid of some of the moisture, stopping the final product from being too soggy. The cooled roasted pear chunks are then tossed through the scone dough, and stay firm enough after baking to give an amazing variation in texture. The honey on the top adds a lovely sweetness, and then the flaky salt on top cuts perfectly through the honey, while adding crunch. Because of the giant chunks of pear, the scones are slightly more craggy and rustic than regular scones, but I promise you that this is totally made up for by how they taste. They would make a perfect morning or afternoon treat, and are easy enough that you can quickly whip them up at short notice. Enjoy!

A few wee tips:

  • These are a little more craggy than traditional scones, because of the moisture provided by the pear. This also makes them super tender and delicious.

  • Depending on the juiciness of the pear, you may need a little additional liquid in the scones. Add the amount called for in the recipe, then add by the teaspoon as needed, focussing on dry spots. The pears do provide some moisture, so make sure you are aware of this - you won’t need more than 240g (1 cup) of milk total.

  • Because you don’t want to completely squish the pear, I add three quarters of the milk and mix it into the flour mixture, before tossing in the roasted pear chunks. This helps reduce the chances of breaking up the pear as you mix in the rest of the milk.

  • Don’t take the honey too far - you only want to boil it for a minute tops. If you take it too far it turns into a hard caramel that is super hard to eat. I took mine to 240°f / 115°c and then left it to stand, where it thickened nicely.

 

 

Roasted Pear and Vanilla Bean Scones with Salty Honey Glaze

- Makes 8 Large Scones -

Scones
6 large, firmish pears, peeled, cored, and diced (800g chopped pear)
600g all-purpose flour
5 tsp baking powder
Pinch of salt
160g unsalted butter, diced into small cubes and frozen for 15 minutes
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
210g whole milk, divided, plus a little extra if required (see notes)

Honey Glaze
150g honey (I used a raw clover honey)
Flaky Sea Salt to finish

 

- PROCESS -

SCONES

Preheat the oven to 400°f / 200°c. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Spread the diced pear evenly over the lined sheet. Roast the pear for 20 to 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the pear feels dry and is beginning to turn golden brown in places. Remove from the oven and allow to cool. Leave the oven on.

In a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder and salt. Add the butter and rub in using your fingertips until it is mainly combined, with a few lumps remaining. Mix the vanilla bean paste into the milk. Add about half of the milk into the dry ingredients, mixing with a spatula or your hands until combined. Add the cooled pear chunks to the bowl, and toss well with your hands to ensure they are evenly dispersed through the mixture.

Add the remainder of the milk, and mix gently with your hands until incorporated, taking care to not crush too much of the pear chunks. You want the dough to be cohesive with no dry parts. Add extra milk a teaspoon at a time if needed, and mix to combine.

Line the baking sheet used for the pears with a fresh piece of parchment paper. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and flatten into a rectangle using your hands. Using a sharp knife or bench scraper, cut the dough into 8 pieces. Dust the bottoms of the scones lightly with flour and arrange evenly on the prepared baking sheet.

Bake the scones for 20-25 minutes, until they are golden brown on the bottoms and lightly golden brown on top. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on the baking sheet for 10 minutes, then transfer to a wire cooling rack. While the scones are cooling on the rack, prepare the honey glaze.

 

SALTY HONEY GLAZE

Place the honey in a small saucepan and place over medium heat. Heat, swirling the pan occasionally, until it starts to bubble. Once the honey is boiling, boil for one minute, then remove from the heat and allow to stand in the saucepan for 20 minutes to cool and thicken.

Using a pastry brush, brush the cooled honey thickly onto the top of the scones. Finish with flaky sea salt. Best eaten the day they are made, but leftovers can be stored in an airtight container and reheated in the microwave before eating.

Roasted Pear and Vanilla Bean Scones with Salty Honey Glaze - Giant Craggy Scones filled with pear chunks held together with tender scone dough, and finished with a sticky honey glaze and a generous dose of flaky sea salt.